Alberta can’t blame the equalization system for its economic mess

Undisciplined spending by successive governments is responsible for Alberta’s fiscal problems

Alberta can’t blame the equalization system for its economic messBy Ben Eisen and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute In William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, one of the conspirators encourages his ally not to blame fate for his misfortunes, but rather to recognize his own responsibility. “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves,” says Cassius. When it comes to the state…

Ontario can learn from B.C.’s education model

Independent schools deliver higher student test scores at lower costs to taxpayers

Ontario can learn from B.C.’s education modelWith another school year ending, it’s a good time to reflect on kindergarten-to-Grade-12 education in Ontario. As the second largest area of provincial expenditure, it can’t escape review as incoming premier Doug Ford’s new government plans to rein in spending. Fortunately one only needs to look to British Columbia for an example of how independent…

We need to measure basic-needs poverty, not inequality

The fundamental problem with relative measures of poverty is that they often give us results that border on absurd

We need to measure basic-needs poverty, not inequalityDoes Canada need a new measure of poverty? That’s what Michael Wolfson, member of the Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics at the University of Ottawa, recently argued. According to Wolfson, poverty (in the Canadian context) is hard to measure because it’s connected to issues such as disability, literacy, food insecurity and the like.…

Alberta can learn from B.C.’s independent school success

Independent schools provide increased choice and better outcomes for students than the current model Alberta employs

Alberta can learn from B.C.’s independent school successAs another school year ends, it’s a good time to reflect on kindergarten-go-Grade-12 education in Alberta, including independent schools and how they fit into the overall model of education. Although more and more families are choosing independent schools, there are many who view these schools with suspicion and would prefer a more homogenized system. However,…

Ottawa lays another brick in the wall to stop Alberta oil exports

Ottawa ignores the evidence with Bill C-48, which will make it more difficult to ship oil and byproducts to lucrative Asian markets

Ottawa lays another brick in the wall to stop Alberta oil exportsAs virtually everyone knows by now, the federal government decided to address Canada’s inability to get pipelines built from Alberta to tidewater the old fashioned way. It nationalized the last viable pipeline project, the twinning of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, and paid $4.5 billion for the existing pipeline. With that purchase, we have…

Stemming the demographic tide on entrepreneurship in the U.K.

Providing tax relief, eliminating red tape and building entrepreneurial skills will help business startups

Stemming the demographic tide on entrepreneurship in the U.K.By Steven Globerman and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Entrepreneurship is widely acknowledged as the basis for innovation, technological advancement and economic progress – and subsequently, a driving force for improved living standards. Yet there’s little discussion, let alone action, in the United Kingdom to stem the adverse effects of demographic change on entrepreneurship, specifically…

Deficit spending is no free lunch; it’s a bill to future taxpayers

The government should stop kicking the can down the road and reduce federal spending now to avoid future tax increases

Deficit spending is no free lunch; it’s a bill to future taxpayersBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute The federal government ran a $19.4-billion budget deficit in 2017-18, according its fiscal monitor. And this government’s appetite for deficit spending shows no signs of relenting. In fact, there’s no plan to balance the federal budget for the next three decades. With deficits becoming common again,…

Stemming the demographic tide on U.S. entrepreneurship

Policy levers exist that can improve entrepreneurial incentives and increase the chances of successful new business startups

Stemming the demographic tide on U.S. entrepreneurshipBy Steven Globerman and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Entrepreneurship is part of the American DNA and broadly recognized as the basis for improved living standards through innovation and technological progress. Unfortunately, policy-makers in Washington and across the country, and average Americans more broadly, seem unaware of the decline in entrepreneurship over the past two…

The private cost of health-care queues in Canada

Our closed government-heavy system stands in stark contrast to other universal health-care systems that have shorter wait times

The private cost of health-care queues in CanadaIt’s no secret that Canadians face some of the longest health-care wait times in the developed world. According to the Fraser Institute’s annual survey of physicians, at 21.2 weeks from referral to treatment, Canadians waited longer in 2017 than ever before. And for some patients, wait times can have serious consequences. While this may be…

CPP’s perpetual head start

Private pensions face regulatory burdens that the Canada Pension Plan does not

CPP’s perpetual head startBy Moin A. Yahya and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute In 2016, in fulfillment of a campaign promise, the federal government reached an agreement with the provinces to expand the Canada Pension Plan. Consequently, mandatory CPP contributions from working Canadians will increase steadily between January 2019 and 2025. Expansion proponents have used many faulty claims…

City hall holds the key to solving Canada’s urban housing crisis

As centres for jobs, education and innovation, municipalities play an outsized role in Canada’s continued prosperity

City hall holds the key to solving Canada’s urban housing crisisBy Kenneth P. Green and Josef Filipowicz The Fraser Institute For mayors, councillors and city staff in Canada’s largest cities, housing affordability is – or should be – top of mind. With the cost of owning a home out of reach for many, and the ability to rent hampered by virtually non-existent vacancies in the…

Economic incentives pay dividends

A recognition that incentives matter would require a wholesale reversal of many, if not most, of the economic policies enacted by the Trudeau government

Economic incentives pay dividendsBy Jason Clemens, Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute There have been many assessments, mostly critical, of the federal government’s decision to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline. And yet, a key aspect of the decision – this government’s dismissive view of the importance of incentives – has been almost entirely ignored. The government…

No pipeline to energy sector investment

Trudeau government nationalizing Trans Mountain pipeline project is further proof that Canada is closed for business

No pipeline to energy sector investmentBy Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute In a stunning turn in an already unprecedented saga, Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced last week that the federal government will buy the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project from Kinder Morgan for $4.5 billion, essentially nationalizing the project. The agreement, which federal Natural Resources Minister Jim…

Raising B.C.’s minimum wage won’t help working poor

A work-based subsidy increases the income of the working poor without making it harder for employers to hire less-skilled workers

Raising B.C.’s minimum wage won’t help working poorBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute On June 1, the minimum wage in British Columbia increased from $11.35 to $12.65 per hour – the first in a series of hikes en route to $15.20 in 2021. That’s a 34 per cent increase in three years. Despite claims from Premier John Horgan and…

Trans Mountain pipeline will benefit Canada – at a very high price

Nationalizing the project is far from ideal. It’s an admission that Canada’s regulatory approval process is profoundly broken

Trans Mountain pipeline will benefit Canada – at a very high priceLast week, Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced that the federal government will buy the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project for $4.5 billion. The government plans to construct the pipeline through a Crown corporation, with an expectation of selling it or otherwise transferring ownership in the future. The project will nearly triple the capacity to move…