EDC’s lack of cash threatens taxpayers

The Crown corporation could be worth up to $30 billion if divested. But it could be worthless if it can’t realize its assets as cash

EDC’s lack of cash threatens taxpayersBy Ian Madsen and Alexandra Burnett Frontier Centre for Public Policy Export Development Canada (EDC) is unable to convert its reported profits into cash, posing an increasing risk to Canadian taxpayers. And it has been funding ventures that are normally considered too risky for commercial banks to handle. EDC is a federal Crown corporation that…

Indigenous child welfare system remains dysfunctional

Decades after the ’60s Scoop, we're no closer to a successful model to help children from troubled homes

Indigenous child welfare system remains dysfunctionalThe ’60s Scoop is back in the news again. And we're no closer to a solution to a problem that has plagued the nation for generations. The federal government has set aside $875 million for Indigenous adults who were adopted into non-Indigenous homes in the 1960s, ’70s and early ’80s. Those who accept the money…

Trans Mountain opponents out of touch with reality

B.C. still exports coal because to do otherwise would be to kill jobs in the province. The contrast with its pipeline stance is startling

Trans Mountain opponents out of touch with realityMany opponents of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion justify their opposition by citing concerns about climate change and carbon emissions, but this raises some important questions. What about coal? Vancouver is North America's largest exporter of coal, one-third of it thermal coal for generating electricity. Vancouver exports U.S. coal because Oregon and Washington have stopped…

Indigenous rights are not absolute

Public policy discourse needs to move away from where Indigenous issues are paramount to where they’re one set among many

Indigenous rights are not absoluteIndigenous people too often seem to think that their rights are absolute or act as if their rights trump everything else. This attitude was seen clearly in a reaction from the Saskatchewan-based Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) after the Saskatchewan government changed the policy regarding when people can hunt on summer pasture lands. All…

Is western civilization worth defending?

The science, culture and philosophy of the West have been embraced around the world. And millions still flock to our shores

Is western civilization worth defending?“An anthropologist is someone who respects the distinctive values of every culture but his own. We in the West are all anthropologists now.” – Roger Kimball, The Fortunes of Permanence: Culture and Anarchy in an Age of America Soon after arriving at McGill University in 1968 from a year of ethnographic field research in Iran,…

Let’s get past the need for apologies about the past

If apologies must flow if reconciliation is to be achieved in Canada, native groups should also issue regrets for their bygone evils

Let’s get past the need for apologies about the pastBy Gerry Bowler and Rod Clifton Frontier Centre for Public Policy The string of calls for public apologies continues unabated. How many apologies are enough? Yet again, demands have been made that Pope Francis apologize for the role that the Catholic Church played in the Indian Residential School system. His refusal to do so has…

Is Indigenous traditional knowledge science?

The notion of knowledge delivered through a magical or spiritual component disagrees with the accepted definition of science

Is Indigenous traditional knowledge science?Proposed federal legislation dealing with environmental assessment changes, Bill C-69, says that “traditional knowledge of the Indigenous peoples of Canada” should be considered when assessing projects. In effect, this legislation would place traditional knowledge on an equal plane with science. It does not, however, define traditional knowledge. A deputy minister from Quebec said the bill…

The next generation of Canadian superheroes

It's time to rally around a new group of fictional characters who tackle our nation's shortcomings with style and commitment

The next generation of Canadian superheroesMuch has been made lately of the arrival of a new Canadian superhero. Amka Aliyak, alias Snowguard, a shape-shifting Inuit from Pangnirtung, Nunavut, will soon be appearing on the pages of a Marvel comic book. With the assistance of her spirit guide Sila, Snowguard can transform into animal form, a useful attribute as she battles…

Pipeline drama provides great politics, dubious policy

This is as close as Canadian politics gets to reality TV, with self-interested actors embroiled in conflict against a common enemy

Pipeline drama provides great politics, dubious policyCanada’s latest political drama has come from the state of jeopardy of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. The federal government has announced it will take over the project from Kinder Morgan for $4.5 billion. The B.C. government is asking the courts if it can block the pipeline, creating bipartisan agreement by Alberta politicians for some…

Television’s telling trend to female cops

On fictional program after fictional program, women dominate. Now universities reflect that trend in reality. Will the job market follow?

Television’s telling trend to female copsIn contemporary British and Canadian television programs, women are portrayed as the prominent police officers, with men of colour as their main complements, and white men presented in demeaning ways or absent altogether. Scott and Bailey (British) is both produced and directed by women. It features two white female detectives, both constables at first, then…
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