The black hole of increased funding for scientific research

Increasing investment in science is fine, but rarely does the investment seem to lead to an improvement in the lives of Canadians

The black hole of increased funding for scientific researchIn the recently released 2018 budget, I was pleased to see that the Liberal government has chosen to invest heavily in discovery-based research. According to Finance Minister Bill Morneau, this is the single largest investment in investigator-led fundamental research in Canadian history. This move is welcomed by universities because science was starved by the previous…

A green city project in Russia comes alive

The project is supported by thorough research into what works best to create a green city, a large injection of funds and the participation of lots of volunteers

A green city project in Russia comes aliveBy Natalia Pryadilina, Roy Damary and Allan Bonner The green city movement has given environmentalism new energy and purpose. Large urban populations offer economies of scale and walkability, and bring businesses closer to each other, their customers and their suppliers. But all of this comes with costs: pollution and waste. Understanding the greening of cities is…

A finger on the pulse of Alberta’s legume crops

Dr. Rhonda Bell’s study provides good news for people who hope to avoid developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease

A finger on the pulse of Alberta’s legume cropsPulses may be at the centre of a trade tiff between Canada and India, but they’re also the focus of some very important research to improve your health. Pulse is a term used for the dried seeds of plants in the legume family – beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas. Canada exports pulse crops worth $4.2…

One big asteroid could ruin the mining industry

The space race is on and the payoff is an untold cache of precious metals, large enough to completely dwarf the world's biggest mining companies

One big asteroid could ruin the mining industryWhile not literally pie in the sky, asteroid mining used to be science fiction. It's getting closer to reality. Various private space companies have focused on launching satellites, with hazy side-bets on future colonization ventures. And now, technological advances make mining asteroids a legitimate prospect. There are millions of asteroids in space, many orbiting between…

Is Ottawa really committed to new resource development?

It's doubtful. Its plan to “improve” the NEB actually makes it more difficult and costly for business to navigate

Is Ottawa really committed to new resource development?By Kenneth Green and Ross McKitrick The Fraser Institute The federal government recently announced its plan to “improve” the National Energy Board. The language of the announcement is all “sunny ways,” promising to be all things to all stakeholders. But the promises are incompatible. The announcement says the new approval process for major energy projects will…

Building a passion for STEM studies among women and girls

Only 20 per cent of Canada’s post-secondary science, technology, engineering and mathematics students are female. That must change. Here's how to start

Building a passion for STEM studies among women and girlsBy Sen. Art Eggleton and Sen. Raymonde Saint-Germain We recently celebrated International Day of Women and Girls in Science – and there’s much to celebrate. But there’s much work to be done, as well. It’s a day to celebrate just how far we’ve come since Elsie MacGill, aircraft designer and Canada’s first female engineer, was…

Lost in the fog: climate manipulation is all too real

Don’t blame carbon emissions on weird weather. Corporations and governments have been changing the weather quite intentionally for decades

Lost in the fog: climate manipulation is all too real“How’s the weather?” is far more than a shallow conversation starter. It’s a serious issue. Many would be surprised to know that 100 years ago, the scientific interest in weather surpassed mere observation and advanced into outright modification. A brief survey of mainstream news reports and public documents in the United States confirms a largely…

Turning the truth about carbon taxation on its head

Some people actually believe the nonsense that taxing carbon leads to economic growth

Turning the truth about carbon taxation on its headThe facts are in. And the evidence proves provinces with female premiers have the fastest growing economies. No wait, that's not it. Bigger provinces grow faster. Or maybe it's that provinces whose names end in vowels do better that those ending in consonants. It's all random nonsense, of course. But that's the level of economic…

We’re flushing money and resources down the drain

To Dr. Nicholas Ashbolt, wastewater has great value, but realizing that value requires an infrastructure overhaul

We’re flushing money and resources down the drainOnce you learn what Dr. Nicholas Ashbolt does for a living, you’ll never look at plumbing the same way again. Ashbolt believes it’s time for a paradigm shift in the way we think about water, sewage and public health. From his perspective, wastewater has value and we should stop flushing money and resources down the…

Fluoride is not only pointless, it’s a health risk

There are concerns about fluoride’s effect on IQ. And the cost of fluoridation far exceeds its claimed benefit

Fluoride is not only pointless, it’s a health riskBy Dr. Bob Dickson and Dr. Hardy Limeback Contributors The fluoridation debate is still very much alive in Calgary, where pro-fluoridation advocates have had a field day, citing claims that seemingly support their position. Many of those claims are either misleading or completely incorrect. A recent letter in the Calgary Herald signed by 22 dentists,…
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