Waiting for the next inevitable mass murder

Too many Americans love their guns too much to ever surrender them simply because a law says they must

Waiting for the next inevitable mass murderLast week saw yet another school shooting in the United States. It has led to the now predictable and oft-repeated reactions on all sides. The public and politicians alike offer prayers, condolences and, frankly, precious little else in the way of concrete plans of action. Highlighted are the always-poignant stories of isolated acts of sacrifice…

Sooner or later, we will turn away from oil

Part 2: Albertans can lead the next economic revolution by pioneering new energy enterprises

Sooner or later, we will turn away from oilShould Alberta be allowed to move its unrefined diluted bitumen to British Coumbia’s tidewater in Burnaby via pipeline and then quadruple tanker traffic through Vancouver harbour, the city that bills itself as the world’s greenest? And does the pipeline proponent, Kinder Morgan, have the permission of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, the unceded…

UCP: go back to school on proposed education reforms

The Alberta party’s proposal to increase funding for independent schools is unlikely to improve education in Alberta

UCP: go back to school on proposed education reformsBy Angela MacLeod and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Alberta’s United Conservative Party (UCP) recently released a host of policy proposals in advance of its annual general meeting in May. They included proposed reforms in education that are unlikely to achieve their goals and could make things worse. The proposals presume that Alberta’s kindergarten-to-Grade-12 education system needs…

Lost in the fog: climate manipulation is all too real

Don’t blame carbon emissions on weird weather. Corporations and governments have been changing the weather quite intentionally for decades

Lost in the fog: climate manipulation is all too real“How’s the weather?” is far more than a shallow conversation starter. It’s a serious issue. Many would be surprised to know that 100 years ago, the scientific interest in weather surpassed mere observation and advanced into outright modification. A brief survey of mainstream news reports and public documents in the United States confirms a largely…

Buildings must be the foundation of a green city

Building standards include energy balance and water use, health and well-being of occupants, pollution, transport, materials, waste and ecology

Buildings must be the foundation of a green cityBy Natalia Pryadilina, Roy Damary and Allan Bonner Densely-populated cities are good for the environment in many ways. Condominiums and apartment buildings are more efficiently and easily heated and cooled. Public transport systems move people using a smaller environmental footprint. Walking is healthy. Yet cities also bring noise and air pollution. They create heat islands as…

Prepping for the reality of privatizing Canada’s power utilities

The uncertain future of Puerto Rico's badly managed power utility (PREPA) should serve as a clear warning to several provincial governments

Prepping for the reality of privatizing Canada’s power utilitiesPublic power utilities from B.C. to Newfoundland have expanded enormously, adding copious debt to provinces. This has burdened consumers and businesses with increasingly high power bills and will eventually lower their standards of living. With unsustainable debts, the provinces are going to be in trouble and restructuring looms for these companies. What’s happening in Puerto…

Genetics strongly influence our predisposition to mental illness

It is becoming increasingly clear that our genes influence everything from our personality traits to specific psychiatric disorders

Genetics strongly influence our predisposition to mental illnessNature has been pitted against nurture for centuries. People have always pondered the question of whether human behaviour is primarily dictated by genetic hard-wiring or by our experiences and environmental factors. The debate has lasted so long because we know comparatively little about the functioning of the human brain. As a result, disorders of the…

Crossing the hard line between the judiciary and politics

Just as it’s improper for a judge to comment on political matters, it’s completely inappropriate for politicians to comment publicly about court cases

Crossing the hard line between the judiciary and politicsThe jury trial of Gerald Stanley, charged with second-degree murder in the death of Colten Boushie, marks a new development in criminal law. The trial itself was not unusual – a jury heard the evidence, deliberated and acquitted the Saskatchewan farmer. It’s what followed the acquittal that’s remarkable. Immediately following the verdict, the most senior…

Quit blaming workers for rising inflation

By raising interest rates, central bankers are moving away from one of their prime purposes: to maximize employment

Quit blaming workers for rising inflationFinancial markets were in a tizzy last week. The Dow Jones industrial average wobbled, falling over 1,500 points in near-panic selling over several days. And then, as if on cue, stock markets all over the world were soon 'correcting' with the Dow. What caused markets to fall? According to the experts, there were several root…

Let’s stop gratuitously thrashing historical reputations

Emily Murphy should be celebrated for her accomplishments and how they changed Canadian society for the better, not reviled for her shortcomings

Let’s stop gratuitously thrashing historical reputationsDecades ago, I remember my father complaining about “the new fashion for debunking.” But imbued with the certainty of a university freshman, I wasn’t particularly sympathetic. In retrospect, though, he had a point. I was reminded of this the other day when I came across my research notes for a decade-old historical journal essay on…
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