Big spending, big problems on the horizon for B.C. government

Despite the promise of yet more new programs to come, there’s actually little room in the budget for more spending

Big spending, big problems on the horizon for B.C. governmentBy Charles Lammam and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute British Columbia’s new government has tabled its first budget, proposing to ramp up spending and shrink last year’s $2.7-billion surplus to almost zero, despite enacting a host of economically-damaging tax increases that the NDP campaigned on. And the budget does’t include everything the New Democrats promised during the…

B.C. budget abandons any hope for efficient carbon tax

Subsidizing green projects with revenue from carbon taxes may be politically popular but it’s fundamentally misguided policy

B.C. budget abandons any hope for efficient carbon taxBy Kenneth P. Green, Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute In its first budget, B.C. Premier John Horgan’s government recently said it would raise the carbon tax rate by 66 per cent over the next four years. And it rejected revenue neutrality, undermining the case for an economically efficient carbon tax. British Columbia’s…

Environment-friendly “plyscrapers” blocked by red tape

The USDA estimates every four storeys would save the same amount of carbon emissions as created by 500 cars every year

Environment-friendly “plyscrapers” blocked by red tapeIf a tree falls in the forest, can a tree-hugger cheer? Yes, believe it or not. Felled trees can now replace concrete and steel in high-rise buildings, saving their weight in carbon emissions. Engineers and environmentalists are both rightfully excited by the new innovation in building high-rises. Unfortunately, a recent competition south of the border…

Spending on B.C. public schools up despite dwindling enrolment

Per-student spending is up, flying in the face of claims that education funding has been slashed or that B.C. schools are starved for resources

Spending on B.C. public schools up despite dwindling enrolmentBy Angela MacLeod and Joel Emes The Fraser Institute Back to school is an expensive time of year for B.C. families. Whether it’s new shoes, school supplies, a bus pass or a new computer, families often take a closer look at their budgets to account for the extra spending. It’s also a good time to take…

B.C.’s new government heads for a familiar debt trap

The New Democrats offer up a significant and impressive list of expenditures, with no clear plan how it will pay for them

B.C.’s new government heads for a familiar debt trapBritish Columbia’s NDP government has just treated residents to its first throne speech, followed by an interim budget to carry it through until February, which is the usual month for annual budgets. Looking at all the good things being promised, the budget makes one think of Christmas in September. The new government is being bountiful,…

Another Trudeau turns on Western Canada

Justin risks a similar fate to his father's if he also allows the radical wing of his party to undermine the economy

Another Trudeau turns on Western CanadaThe 2015 federal election campaign may be fading from our memory but we can't forget that in that pivotal campaign the Liberals painted a balanced and attractive picture of Canada's future. Led by the unproven but photogenic Justin Trudeau, the Liberals promised to be more aggressive in protecting the environment and advancing the interests of…

B.C. government: public transit too risky for children

By sending his children to school on public transit in Vancouver, Adrian Cook ran afoul of the provincial government's nanny state mentality

Adrian Crook is a single dad living in downtown Vancouver. His oldest kids – aged seven, eight, nine and 11 – were taught to take public transit to school every day. So successful were they in their independence that a fellow bus passenger who found the dad on Instagram, recognizing him on a bus with…

B.C.’s new business as usual: political and economic uncertainty

NDP election win prompts waves of uncertainty that threaten investment and economic growth in B.C.

B.C.’s new business as usual: political and economic uncertaintyA shadow hangs over British Columbia’s political and economic future. Last spring, B.C. went through one of its most tumultuous and uncertain elections in years. No party received the majority of seats in the May 9 election, creating a hung legislature and political uncertainty. And there was the uncertainty regarding who the Green Party would…

The unintended, and painful, consequences of a $15 minimum wage

A government-mandated increase in the price of low-skilled labour tends to lead employers to reduce their labour force

The unintended, and painful, consequences of a $15 minimum wageBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute It seems obvious: if you want to give low-wage workers a raise, increase the minimum wage. But raising minimum wage produces unintended consequences that hurt many of the people it’s supposed to help. B.C.’s new government recently promised to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2021,…

The search for Trans Mountain’s 15,000 construction jobs

Why would elected officials promote a construction jobs figure six times Kinder Morgan’s actual number?

The search for Trans Mountain’s 15,000 construction jobsWhen Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project, he said it “will create 15,000 new, middle class jobs – the majority of them in the trades.” Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr repeatedly points to this figure to justify the federal government’s approval. He says, “the project is expected to…
1 5 6 7 8 9 11