Canada an environmental leader, not a laggard

Compare Canada’s performance with other countries on measures that matter most to the health of people and the ecosystem

Canada an environmental leader, not a laggardBy Ross McKitrick, Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute Despite misguided claims to the contrary, Canada has an excellent environmental record when compared to most of the world’s wealthiest – and cleanest – countries. A new study published by the Fraser Institute compares and ranks 33 high-income countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation…

The decline … and fall … of Tim Hortons

How an iconic brand lost its Canadian identity and why its corporate masters probably don't care

The decline … and fall … of Tim HortonsThe bad news keeps piling up for Tim Hortons. Leger and National Public Relations recently released their annual report ranking Canada’s most admired companies. Google and Shoppers Drug Mart topped the rankings of most respected companies, regardless of where the company resides. Google has been No. 1 for six years. Kellogg’s, in eighth place, is…

How to provide consistent health care to all Canadians

We all must have access to high-quality health care. Unjustifiable variations are still too common across the country

How to provide consistent health care to all CanadiansBy P.G. Forest and Danielle Martin EvidenceNetwork.ca Canadian medicare would not exist without the actions of the federal government. But in recent years, there’s been an atrophy of the imagination about Ottawa’s role in health policy, as if federal transfer payments to the provinces and territories were the beginning and the end of everything. We…

The Trudeau train wreck

Trudeau's National Lampoon’s Indian Vacation was an embarrassment to Canada

The Trudeau train wreckDear Justin,  You don’t mind if we call you Justin, do you? In other circumstances, we’d call you prime minister, but – to be perfectly candid – your Indian family vacation wasn’t terribly prime ministerial. The complications arising from that trip continue to be felt, too. On Wednesday morning of last week – on what…

Flu pandemic of 1918 brutal, virulent killer

One hundred years ago, a flu pandemic swept across the world, killing tens of millions of people, particularly those in the prime of life

Flu pandemic of 1918 brutal, virulent killerFrom the wet and windswept northwest of Ireland to rural southwestern Ontario, the flu pandemic of 1918 to 1920 was remorseless. My mother and my wife’s father lost siblings to an illness where death might come within 24 hours of first symptoms. And sometimes it was particularly brutal. Historian John Barry has described it this…

Why won’t Canada stand up to Purdue Pharma?

The opioid manufacturer admits to illegal activity in the U.S., stops ads there and pays hundreds of millions in penalties. In Canada, it's business as usual

Why won’t Canada stand up to Purdue Pharma?By Nav Persaud and Andrew S. Boozary EvidenceNetwork.ca Canadians are paying dearly for government inaction over the opioid crisis. Purdue Pharma recently announced that it will stop advertising opioids to doctors in the United States after pleading guilty to misleading marketing more than a decade ago. This is a major, albeit belated, departure from the…

For Olympic success emulate the freestylers

Based on the results in South Korea, Canada’s formula for future Olympic success is obvious: emulate the freestylers

For Olympic success emulate the freestylersI know it’s still four years until the next Winter Olympics in Japan. But when they start the planning for Canada’s next Winter Games contingent, might I recommend that they let the freestylers run the show? You may have noticed the Canadian freestyle skiers and snowboarders as they took on half-pipes, ski cross, moguls and…

Polar opposites: where’s the middle ground in politics?

By better understanding how various political factions differ, perhaps we can help close some fundamental gaps in society

Polar opposites: where’s the middle ground in politics?North American political polarization is on the rise. Those on the left appear to move ever further to the left, while those on the right find less and less in common with fellow citizens. The political rhetoric has escalated to a toxic level. Half of Americans are labelled sexist, racist, homophobic and Islamophobic; a basket…

Canada’s cross-cultural identity deeply rooted in western society

While there’s great diversity in Canada – regional, urban-rural, French-English and ethnic – it’s encompassed within the framework of Canadian culture

Canada’s cross-cultural identity deeply rooted in western societyThe view that ‘‘There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada,’’ put forward by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, is incorrect. Notwithstanding Canada’s official multiculturalism policy, Canadian culture is firmly based in western civilization. The main Canadian political structures are derived from western civilization: Language is a foundational substructure of culture, and Canada’s two official…

CPP reforms need a complete rethink

The 2016 CPP reforms were solutions in search of a problem – and don’t even solve the imagined problem

CPP reforms need a complete rethinkBy Jason Clemens and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) needs a comprehensive review, followed by real reform. The provincial and federal finance ministers said recently they will re-examine certain aspects of the CPP reforms agreed to in late 2016. But they will avoid a larger re-evaluation of the efficacy of an expanded CPP. Clearly,…

Repair regional relations in Canada before it’s too late

If we want Canada to add up to more than the sum of its parts, we need to get our regional house in order

Repair regional relations in Canada before it’s too lateCanada is a big and diverse place. People, power, economic opportunities, public policy priorities, language and cultural nuances are not evenly spread from sea to sea to sea. It’s always been a struggle to make sure the various regions are working together, treated fairly and adequately represented at the national level. Lately, however, serious efforts…

Government’s often waste money in their rush to save it

We need to think of the real value of results. If it costs $10 to find out we wasted $1, what’s the point?

Government’s often waste money in their rush to save itMost people want value for money from their governments. We’re outraged at waste – whether on a $16 glass of orange juice or billions on a megaproject. Public administrators wrestle with new and better ways to measure results. But sometimes money is saved by not trying to save money. Expenditures are made within a political…