Don’t judge historic figures without knowledge of our history

Canadian curriculums fail students when it comes to teaching the content necessary to have informed, intelligent debate

Don’t judge historic figures without knowledge of our historyLast fall, the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario demanded that Sir John A. Macdonald’s name be stricken from all public schools in the province. More recently, Halifax city council voted to remove the Edward Cornwallis statue that had stood downtown since 1931. Both decisions were vigorously debated and public opinion remains sharply divided. These are…

Let’s stop gratuitously thrashing historical reputations

Emily Murphy should be celebrated for her accomplishments and how they changed Canadian society for the better, not reviled for her shortcomings

Let’s stop gratuitously thrashing historical reputationsDecades ago, I remember my father complaining about “the new fashion for debunking.” But imbued with the certainty of a university freshman, I wasn’t particularly sympathetic. In retrospect, though, he had a point. I was reminded of this the other day when I came across my research notes for a decade-old historical journal essay on…

Enduring words of wisdom on reconciliation

If we had listened to Pierre Trudeau, we would no longer be talking about reconciliation – we would be at least part way there

Enduring words of wisdom on reconciliationReconciliation between Canada’s Indigenous people and mainstream society is a goal all thoughtful Canadians seek. It’s obvious that too many Indigenous people lag far behind other Canadians by most economic and health indicators, and we must find ways to close that gap. It’s worthwhile considering what Prime Minister Trudeau has said: “The weight of history…

Stephen Harper in the rearview mirror

Calling the Harper years a particularly dark time for Canada is partisan fiction, not reality

Stephen Harper in the rearview mirrorWilliam Watson’s Financial Post columns are invariably worth reading. As centre-right economists go, his general perspective isn’t unusual, but his penchant for digging into data can be illuminating. One of the things that a dispassionate person might take away from Watson is a more nuanced view of former Canadian Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper. Harper,…

Celebrating Christmas in 18th and 19th century Alberta

Christmas was more primitive in the 18th  and mid-19th century, but it was still Christmas – joy and fellowship were, and are, its primary expression

Celebrating Christmas in 18th and 19th century AlbertaTurn the clock back to the late 18th century and mid-19th century Alberta, and chances are you’d be eating fish, beavertail, and stewed moose rather than roasted turkey and honey-glazed ham for Christmas dinner. Instead of rockin’ to tunes emanating from audio systems and iPods, you’re more likely to be dancing the jig to the sounds of…

The hardships of Orkney link to Canada’s early days

Displaced from their homes, many citizens of the Orkney islands ended up in Canada working for the Hudson Bay Company

The hardships of Orkney link to Canada’s early daysThe Standing Stones of Stenness on Mainland, the main Scottish island of Orkney, date back to approximately 3,100 BC. Stonehenge, to put the Orkneys in time perspective as a Neolithic parent to western Europe, was constructed from 3,000 to 2,000 BC. What was it about these outpost islands that attracted the earliest agriculturalists to their…

Historical harvest event met with sunshine and success

Antique tractors belonging to the museum’s collection were used to run the roughly 100-year-old threshing machines. Several teams of horses were used to pull a 1920s-era binder, grain carts, wagons and other items in the field.

Historical harvest event met with sunshine and successKenneth Brown of The Clarion Farming in the 1920s had few similarities to farming in the 2010s, and members of the Kindersley Antique Threshing Club continue to show people how it was once done. The threshing club held a third annual vintage threshing, horse and binder demonstration on Sept. 24 in a field on the…

Canadians need a civics education refresher

Americans are woefully ignorant of basic government functions; Canadians aren't far behind

Canadians need a civics education refresherCivics education hasn’t been a top priority in most Canadian schools for years. While that’s hardly front page news, the bigger concern is that we understand very little about what our nation is and the foundations upon which it was built. The evidence? In December 2008, Dominion Institute/Ipsos Reid conducted a survey of 1,070 Canadians. The…

The political ties that bind: Lougheed and Blakeney

How a deep trust and enduring friendship helped craft Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and ensure lasting provincial autonomy

The political ties that bind: Lougheed and BlakeneyBy John von Heyking and Thomas Kazakoff University of Lethbridge The relationship between Peter Lougheed and Allen Blakeney demonstrated how consistent trust for one another over a decade’s political enterprise became the foundation for a political friendship, and helped forge Canada as we know it. In his essay Reflections on the Kitchen Accord (2012), former…

Canada should be preserving history, not erasing it

We must stop this ridiculous trend of renaming edifices and cleansing evidence of people's existence from history. If not, where will it end?

Canada should be preserving history, not erasing itThe U.S. has frequently faced controversy over renaming buildings and removing monuments in the South due to historical grievances related to slavery and racism. In recent weeks, Canada has seen a flurry of similar activity. First, the federal Liberal government renamed Langevin Block in Ottawa to the Office of the Prime Minister and Privy Council.…