Giverny and Monet’s Gardens

Stop in Giverny at least for a few hours to wander among Monet's gardens and you'll feel like you've entered one of his paintings

Giverny and Monet’s GardensIf you love Impressionist paintings, why not plan a visit to Giverny, in France, and see Monet’s garden, flowers, pond and bridges for yourself? It’s been said the Impressionist art movement acquired its name from one of Monet’s paintings called “Impression, Sunrise.” Giverny was Monet's home during the last half of his life. He painted…

There’s no taboo to social lying

Too often, the truth can set you free – from jobs, relationships, money and social opportunities

There’s no taboo to social lyingThe first thing to remember in this day of mass media saturation is that there are no great lies – if something is repeated often enough it becomes the truth. That being said, the ultimate great lie is that it is always better to tell the truth. There are needful lies; lies of omission, white…

Victim culture marks a return to a culture of revenge

Where perceived slights are personally avenged, and the law is supplanted as the final arbiter of justice

Victim culture marks a return to a culture of revengeIt’s truly astonishing that no other national political figure beat Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to an apology to the LGBTQ2+ community. In 2008, his predecessor Stephen Harper was first to offer an apology for Indian residential schools. And Canadians have hardly been spared from endless variations on the theme over the past decade. Similarly, the British…

A new wave of B.C. small-town cultural renaissance

Let's be honest, most of B.C.’s artistic community has always lived on the Gulf Islands, on Vancouver Island, up the Sunshine Coast, in Haida Gwaii rather than in Vancouver

A new wave of B.C. small-town cultural renaissanceMy grandfather arrived in Vancouver from England, via the Empress of Canada and the fledgling Canadian Pacific Railway in September 1909. At a goodbye dinner in London, he had been advised by a family friend to “Stay out of the towns – find your fortune in the countryside.” He took that advice literally and found…

The enduring legacy of maverick media baron Jim Shaw

A hard-nosed businessman, he made a brilliant cable territory swap, competed ferociously with Telus and pulled Global television from the Canwest inferno

The enduring legacy of maverick media baron Jim ShawFew occasions better illustrated the cultural divide between the world of the western bottom-up entrepreneur and that of Ottawa’s top-down public service bureaucracy than when Jim Shaw and Konrad von Finckenstein crossed swords in a hearing room. There, front and centre of the raised platform bearing commissioners, would be the multilingual Von Finckenstein, a six-foot-something-awesome…

Netflix next battleground in “protection” of Quebec culture

The protection of Quebec's language and identity is so deeply ingrained in every francophone that nothing as petty as a technology revolution can deter its instincts

Netflix next battleground in “protection” of Quebec cultureAll you need to know about why your Netflix bill will go up sometime in the next couple of years is contained in this paragraph from a recent report in Cartt.ca: “A Quebecor-led coalition of Quebec artists, festivals, production companies, unions, funding agencies and executives at companies including Bell, Cogeco, V, Stingray, Télé-Québec and TV5,…

A more open CRTC is a great leap forward

The names of Commissioners appointed to public panels will now be made public two weeks prior to the commencement of the hearing

A more open CRTC is a great leap forwardTransparency is among the most controversial topics in the public policy arena. So it’s surprising that few if any pundits latched onto the significance of a recent tweak by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) regarding how it runs its hearings. Going forward, tweeted @CRTCeng, the names of Commissioners (the people exercising oversight impacting…

Laila Biali first up for new arts council series

Laila Biali's show on Saturday is the first concert of the performing arts series

Laila Biali first up for new arts council seriesKenneth Brown of The Clarion The first concert in an annual performing arts series features a renowned jazz musician whose performance includes songs by several other iconic Canadian artists. Laila Biali, an award-winning Canadian singer-songwriter and pianist, is known to combine traditional jazz with contemporary pop music on her albums in an effortless and complementary…

Council approves fall recipients of community grants

12 community organizations get funding under semi-annual Kindersley Community Grant program

Council approves fall recipients of community grantsKenneth Brown of The Clarion The town’s elected officials have passed a resolution to approve funds for 12 community organizations under the semi-annual Kindersley Community Grant program. Council members approved the grants at a meeting on Oct. 10 and a total of about $7,690 was approved for the 12 recipients in the fall intake. Each…

Your bills will go up – but don’t assume an insidious CRTC plot

The debate over internet, cable and mobile rates is far more complex than the Twitter universe reflects

Your bills will go up – but don’t assume an insidious CRTC plotAll the average citizen knows about their cable, mobile and Internet bills is that – like taxes – they always  go up. For those who care why this happens, a brief Twitter tour of #crtc will introduce you to the debates surrounding the inexhaustible and often catty haggling over how your cable, cellphone and Internet…