Why some of us prefer Conservative parties over their leaders

Jason Kenney and Doug Ford don't have great approval ratings. But voters seem to favour their parties in Alberta and Ontario

Why some of us prefer Conservative parties over their leadersAn intriguing phenomenon is beginning to occur in our nation’s politics. Some Canadians seemed to be pleased with the policies of Conservative parties and are willing to vote for them – in spite of some apprehension toward certain party leaders. Here are two recent examples. A Mainstreet Research poll released on Jan. 22 revealed that…

Jagmeet Singh’s political future keeps twisting and turning

The Liberals forced out Karen Wang and Singh looked certain to win the byelection. Then the Liberals found a formidable replacement

Jagmeet Singh’s political future keeps twisting and turningAfter federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh’s horrible interview with CTV’s Evan Solomon last week, some political observers believed his chances of winning the Burnaby South byelection in B.C. had seriously diminished. Then he received a stroke of luck that even a Las Vegas bookmaker would have admired. His Liberal opponent, Karen Wang, resigned on Jan.…

Are NDP supporters getting fed up with Jagmeet Singh?

The federal leader seems unaware of key issues. That can hardly give party supporters confidence in his abilities

Are NDP supporters getting fed up with Jagmeet Singh?In only a couple of minutes, Jagmeet Singh showed why he’s not going to last in federal politics. The federal NDP leader had an interview on CTV’s Question Period with host Evan Solomon on Sunday. Near the end of their discussion, Solomon asked him about a Jan. 9 Hill Times opinion piece written by Lu…

The fundamental flaw of populist politics

The populist trinity of direct democracy – initiative, referendum and recall – is incompatible with the Canadian political system

The fundamental flaw of populist politicsThe recent Robyn Luff controversy in Alberta illustrates two much broader issues. One is that this MLA, like many Canadians, doesn’t understand how the Westminster-style parliamentary system works. The other is the remarkable persistence of the notion that MLAs are merely delegates of their constituents. Luff, the Calgary-East MLA, complained about being forced to toe…

Why Justin Trudeau won’t call a byelection in Burnaby South

The last thing the Liberals want is for the NDP to take the spotlight or to start drawing votes on the left-centre

Why Justin Trudeau won’t call a byelection in Burnaby SouthWhy won’t Prime Minister Justin Trudeau call a byelection in Burnaby South? It’s a question some Canadians are still trying to figure out, even though the answer is right in front of them. Let’s take a closer look at this controversy. The Liberals aren’t obligated to call a byelection in the B.C. riding. Trudeau has…

There’s nothing ‘affordable’ about B.C. tax increases

Higher carbon, personal income, payroll, business and residential property taxes will hit B.C. families and make the province less attractive for business

There’s nothing ‘affordable’ about B.C. tax increasesBy Niels Veldhuis and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute “Making your life more affordable” has been a dominant rhetorical theme of British Columbia’s government – so much so that its 2018 budget uses the word “affordable” 76 times. Finance Minister Carole James mentioned “affordable” 26 times in her latest budget speech. While making life more affordable…

Proportional representation breeds unstable governments

B.C.’s electoral reform referendum could lead to more shaky coalitions and less effective government

Proportional representation breeds unstable governmentsSome see the upcoming B.C. referendum on electoral reform – whether the province should switch to a proportional representation (PR) voting system – as a blatant attempt by the B.C. Green Party to secure more power. While it’s clear that under any form of PR, the Greens could increase their seat share, there would also…

The Liberal’s lukewarm shift toward electoral reform

The Trudeau government’s belated commitment to election law revisions is welcome, if far short of earlier promises

The Liberal’s lukewarm shift toward electoral reformThe recent introduction by the federal government of Bill C 76, meant to overhaul Canada’s Election Act, raises the question: Is a belated commitment to improving electoral democracy better than no commitment at all? The answer has to be yes. However, the Liberals have been conspicuously ambivalent and lukewarm on electoral reform during their time…

Tent cities aren’t the problem, just a symptom

We need to address contributing factors to homelessness, including mental illness, addictions and poverty

Tent cities aren’t the problem, just a symptomTonight, an increasing number of Canadians face the prospect of sleeping in a tent – not to welcome the summer camping season but as a last resort. Unlike regulated campgrounds, tent cities are without electricity, water and often bathrooms. These makeshift encampments appear to be on the rise with Winnipeg and Nanaimo, B.C., being two…

Pipeline drama provides great politics, dubious policy

This is as close as Canadian politics gets to reality TV, with self-interested actors embroiled in conflict against a common enemy

Pipeline drama provides great politics, dubious policyCanada’s latest political drama has come from the state of jeopardy of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. The federal government has announced it will take over the project from Kinder Morgan for $4.5 billion. The B.C. government is asking the courts if it can block the pipeline, creating bipartisan agreement by Alberta politicians for some…

Why Doug Ford should be Ontario’s next premier

Premier Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals are finished. NDP Leader Andrea Horwath proposes a host of nightmarish left-wing changes

Why Doug Ford should be Ontario’s next premierWith two days to go in the Ontario election, there’s only one certainty for election night – and that’s uncertainty. Most political analysts, pundits and columnists believe Premier Kathleen Wynne and the Liberals will be defeated on June 7. The question is by how much. Some believe they’ll be crushed and others think Wynne’s decision…

Ontarians must consider real health-care reform

All three major parties promise massive new spending as the provincial election nears. Better they look to Saskatchewan for ideas

Ontarians must consider real health-care reformBy Jason Clemens and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute Ontarians are less than two weeks away from choosing their next provincial government and polls suggest voters are looking for change, with both the Progressive Conservatives and the New Democrats leading the governing Liberals. Unfortunately, none of the three major party platforms include genuine health-care reform,…

B.C. closing doors to investment

Government policies mean the province is gaining an international reputation as a place where major projects can’t get done

B.C. closing doors to investmentBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute More British Columbians think the province is on the wrong track than the right one, according to a new Angus Reid poll. And there’s good reason to be concerned about B.C.’s policy direction. Since assuming office last year, Premier John Horgan’s government has done little to…

No ray of sunshine in Alberta’s fiscal forecast

Rachel Notley seems intent on duplicating the deep-diving debt performance of former Ontario NDP leader Bob Rae

No ray of sunshine in Alberta’s fiscal forecastBy Ben Eisen and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute When Rachel Notley’s NDP shook Alberta’s political landscape by winning a majority government in 2015, the similarities to the Ontario’s Bob Rae-led NDP government in the 1990s were striking. Both cases marked the first NDP government in provincial history, and both brought an end to Progressive…

Alberta crushed beneath a growing mountain of debt

The slow path to balance means the province will continue adding debt by the bucketful for many years, penalizing future taxpayers

Alberta crushed beneath a growing mountain of debtBy Ben Eisen and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute The Alberta government’s 2018 budget figures would be shocking if Albertans weren’t already accustomed to such numbers. The operating deficit is expected to be $8.8 billion in 2018-19, down slightly from its peak of $10.8 billion two years ago. It’s difficult to contextualize such a large…
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