Groundhog Day, Trans Mountain pipeline style

Once again, the National Energy Board will review the contentious project. It's paralysis by analysis

Groundhog Day, Trans Mountain pipeline styleOn Groundhog Day on Feb. 2, Punxsutawney Phil in the United States and Wiarton Willie in Canada ceremonially emerge from their dens. If they see their shadows (meaning it’s a sunny day), they return to their dens for an additional six weeks of winter. And who can forget the classic movie Groundhog Day? Bill Murray…

Trans Mountain pipeline hurdles never end

The long, convoluted path to rejection demonstrates an approval process that is fundamentally flawed on so many levels

Trans Mountain pipeline hurdles never end“The current state of affairs in Canada is such that building a pipeline to tidewater is practically impossible,” says Alberta Premier Rachel Notley. Truer words were rarely spoken. These ones were spoken at an Aug. 30 press conference as the courts set back the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. The hurdles, it seems, never end. The…

Is Canada’s economic future a game of political ping-pong?

A conversation on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion fiasco and where the nation can go from here

Is Canada’s economic future a game of political ping-pong?By Doug Firby and John Stewart Troy Media Editor's note: Thursday’s Federal Court of Appeal ruling overturning the approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is a victory for opponents but a devastating blow to Alberta’s plans to boost oil-and-gas exports from the province. Doug Firby, Troy Media’s publisher, and John Stewart, editor-in-chief, discuss the…

Alberta’s job recovery brings its own set of problems

Instead of a recovering private sector economy, Alberta has simply expanded its government sector

Alberta’s job recovery brings its own set of problemsBy Charles Lammam and Brennan Sorge The Fraser Institute Premier Rachel Notley’s government has repeatedly pointed to total employ­ment figures as a sign that Alberta has recovered from the recent recession. For instance, the premier recently said “our economy is recovering … and created 90,000 new jobs last year.” But to better understand the state…

Inflated employee pay at the heart of Alberta government’s debt

From wages to benefits to job security to early retirement, government employee compensation must be constrained

Inflated employee pay at the heart of Alberta government’s debtBy Charles Lammam and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute Alberta’s public finances are in rough shape. The government of Premier Rachel Notley expects to run another budget deficit this year (estimated at $8.8 billion) and has no plan to balance the books until at least 2023-24. Since 2014-15, the province has added more than $33…

Help Alberta’s workers by cutting corporate taxes

Lowering corporate taxes means massive increase in business investment, higher wages for workers, lower prices for consumers

Help Alberta’s workers by cutting corporate taxesThis is a tale of two very different Alberta budgets and a lesson on the impact of corporate tax rates. In 2001, the Progressive Conservative government aggressively attacked the province’s corporate tax burden. “Alberta should respond to the worldwide trend to lower corporate income tax rates,” the budget document noted. “If we don’t, we risk…

Notley working to get Alberta off the boom-and-bust roller-coaster

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley explains why and how the province can have both a diversified economy and a strong energy sector

Notley working to get Alberta off the boom-and-bust roller-coasterRachel Notley is premier of Alberta. Calgary’s Business: What’s your overall sense of Alberta's economy and where it's at today and more importantly where it’s headed in the future? Notley: We know things are looking up. You may have heard the jobs numbers before: 90,000 full-time jobs created last year, mostly in the private sector.…

Tax hikes discouraging entrepreneurship in Alberta

'Entrepreneurship is inherently risky and higher personal income taxes decrease the potential income (and reward) for entrepreneurs'

Tax hikes discouraging entrepreneurship in AlbertaA report by the Fraser Institute says Alberta’s personal income tax rate hike may prevent 1,374 new businesses from starting in the province. “Recent tax hikes by the Alberta government are discouraging entrepreneurs from starting new businesses, which are vital for economic growth and prosperity and drive innovation,” said Charles Lammam, director of fiscal studies…

Alberta can’t blame the equalization system for its economic mess

Undisciplined spending by successive governments is responsible for Alberta’s fiscal problems

Alberta can’t blame the equalization system for its economic messBy Ben Eisen and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute In William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, one of the conspirators encourages his ally not to blame fate for his misfortunes, but rather to recognize his own responsibility. “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves,” says Cassius. When it comes to the state…

Alberta sinks deeper into a sea of red ink

The more the government spends on servicing its debt, the less is left over for priorities that Albertans value such as health care

Alberta sinks deeper into a sea of red inkBy Steve Lafleur and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute When people think of the long lost “Alberta Advantage,” they often think first about the province’s tax advantage over other provinces. Specifically, the 10 per cent single rate personal and corporate income taxes that prevailed until 2015. But Alberta enjoyed another fiscal advantage – all other…

The much-delayed wakening of Rip Van Willard

Our erstwhile hero is roused from an almost-35-year slumber to find that much has changed – and some things never change

The much-delayed wakening of Rip Van Willard“It’s a friggin’ miracle … you woke up uncle Willy! I bet your old doc never seen this coming. Who would’a guessed you'd sleep for almost 35 years? How do ya feel?” “Where am I … is this heaven?” “No siree uncle, you're in the Heart of the New West!” “Whoa,where else would I be,…

The great pipeline debate has degenerated

We need a way to drill down to the science and legality related to Trans Mountain. We need to replace cacophony with compromise

The great pipeline debate has degeneratedThe last few months have illustrated how we now argue in public in Canada and the picture is not encouraging. I’m referring to what many think of as the great pipeline debate: the pros and cons of the Kinder Morgan diluted bitumen Trans Mountain pipeline expansion from the Alberta oilsands to tidewater in Vancouver. We…

Investors steering clear of Canada’s energy sector

Uncompetitive policies and regulatory uncertainty are largely to blame

Investors steering clear of Canada’s energy sectorBy Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute Canada’s investment climate for the energy sector can be described as unfavourable, at best. Clearly, investors have reached their breaking point with Canada’s uncompetitive policies and regulatory uncertainty and are steering clear. The result is fewer Canadian jobs and lower economic growth. According to the most…

Trans Mountain a pipeline to prosperity and stability

First Nations support pipelines, including Trans Mountain. Abandoning the project will be a severe blow to those communities

Trans Mountain a pipeline to prosperity and stabilityBy Joseph Quesnel and Kenneth Green The Fraser Institute Alberta Premier Rachel Notley forgot one group of Canadians when she cheered a recent court ruling relating to the $7.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project. “It wasn’t that we won the decision, it was the court wouldn’t even hear it. So, it was a pretty definitive…
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