What to eat to make learning easier

The human body needs the right fuel for optimal performance

What to eat to make learning easierWhen it comes to learning, registered dietitian Heidi Bates likens humans to “high-performance sports cars” that need injections of just the right fuel throughout the day. “If you’re not fuelling the body at regular intervals, the amount of sugar in your blood – which is really the fuel for your brain – will go up…

Five things you should know about eating a high-protein diet

Many people could benefit from getting more plant- and animal-based sources in their meals

Five things you should know about eating a high-protein dietWhen it comes to healthy eating, it’s not always clear what should be on your plate – and in what amounts. What is clear, according to Carla Prado, is that most people can benefit from more protein in their diet. Our bodies need protein to maintain muscle mass and support biological functions such as healing…

A looming chickpea shortage is on the way

Chickpeas are nutritional powerhouses for consumers who don’t necessarily opt for animal proteins

A looming chickpea shortage is on the waySince the start of the pandemic, we have heard about shortages countless times. Most sections of the grocery store have been hit by tightening supplies for one reason or another. But the latest headlines we are seeing are about chickpeas. Many analysts are expecting chickpea inventories to drop significantly in months to come. For westerners,…

Study challenges the link between obesity and junk food advertising

Banning junk food advertising may have little effect on reducing obesity

Study challenges the link between obesity and junk food advertisingA new study from the University of Alberta challenges the notion that advertising junk food is at the root of the obesity epidemic. Growing up in a low social-economic environment is more of a precursor to obesity later in life than junk food advertising, according to the report, with adults who grew up in a…

Health Canada’s new food labelling makes no sense

Saturated fat in beef, and pork: bad. Saturated fat in dairy products: nothing to see here

Health Canada’s new food labelling makes no senseIt looks like we will see different symbols on food packaging soon, telling us whether a food product at the grocery store has too much fat, sugar or sodium. Health Canada is likely going forward with a policy requiring front-of-package nutrition symbols on foods high in saturated fat, sugars and sodium. It will provide clear,…

Would you eat chicken raised on a diet of insects?

Consumers who are environmentally aware warm to the idea

Would you eat chicken raised on a diet of insects?Eating chicken raised on a diet of bugs or algae may sound downright unappetizing to some, but there are ways to make the idea more palatable to at least one type of food shopper. Consumers who are environmentally aware will likely warm up to the idea of using alternative proteins like insect meal in poultry…

Regular exercise, healthy diet could improve odds of surviving cancer

New American Cancer Society guide for survivors highlights exercise, nutrition as key long-term factors

Regular exercise, healthy diet could improve odds of surviving cancerEngaging in regular physical activity and following a healthy diet could help cancer survivors increase their likelihood of long-term survival and reduce the odds of their cancer coming back, according to the American Cancer Society’s newly released guidelines for cancer survivors. “From a cancer patient perspective, these are the things you can do for yourself, to help…

Excess sugar costs Canada $5 billion each year: study

Researchers urge use of taxation, education and subsidies to encourage better eating habits

Excess sugar costs Canada $5 billion each year: studyImagine if the real cost to society of the food you buy at the grocery store was built right into each product’s price. Everything with added sugar would cost a whole lot more, according to University of Alberta researchers in a new study in The Canadian Journal of Public Health. They peg the economic burden of excessive…

Animal-based protein recommended for people being treated for cancer

Fish, meat, dairy help people maintain muscle and tolerate treatments: experts

Animal-based protein recommended for people being treated for cancerIf you’re being treated for cancer, don’t leave meat, fish and dairy off your plate, University of Alberta experts advise. Though avoiding animal-based proteins like red meat may seem healthier, relying on plant-based protein alone isn’t a good plan while fighting cancer, said Carla Prado, a nutrition expert in the Faculty of Agricultural, Life and…

Just stop talking about weight with kids, says public health PhD grad

Research explores the impact of obesity-related stigma on young people – and how to end it

Just stop talking about weight with kids, says public health PhD grad“We should just keep weight out of everyday conversation with our kids.” That’s the conclusion Alexa Ferdinands came to after interviewing young people about their experiences with obesity-related stigma for her PhD in health promotion and socio-behavioural sciences in the University of Alberta’s School of Public Health. “When it comes to nutrition, there are so…

Canada’s raw-milk ban defies common-sense

The alleged dangers will be news to countless families who have grown up on raw milk

Canada’s raw-milk ban defies common-senseThere’s a legal way to consume raw milk in Canada: buy it in the United States and bring it home. Of the 13 states bordering Canada, 12 have legal raw milk. More than 40 have it legal in some form, yet the U.S. has not had a death from raw milk in more than two…

Researcher aims to buy more time for dairy calves to absorb vital antibodies

Immunity problem affects nearly a third of calves worldwide

Researcher aims to buy more time for dairy calves to absorb vital antibodiesA University of Alberta dairy researcher is picking up where scientists left off 40 years ago, trying to solve an ongoing problem with calf health. Up to 30 per cent of dairy calves worldwide don’t get enough vital antibodies before birth to ward off the risk of diarrhea caused by E. coli and other bacteria.…

COVID-19 underscores ‘invisible pandemic’ of diet-related diseases

Public policies can help support better individual choices

COVID-19 underscores ‘invisible pandemic’ of diet-related diseasesThe COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light both weaknesses and opportunities in the way public policies can support children’s long-term health, according to the seventh and final Alberta Nutrition Report Card on Food Environments for Children and Youth, released recently. “Kids eat what’s available to them, what’s affordable and readily accessible,” said principal investigator Kim…

Four U of A researchers named to Royal Society of Canada

Innovators in women and children’s health, water safety, nutrition and archeology join ranks

Four U of A researchers named to Royal Society of CanadaWhy some are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease than others, even when taking into account life-modifying factors like smoking and exercise, boils down to developmental aspects that start in the womb, according to a global authority on vascular pathophysiology in the pregnancy complication of pre-eclampsia. “It sets the stage,” said Sandra Davidge, Distinguished University Professor in…

Nutrition researcher gets funding to find out why diet affects immunity

Immunology is at the centre of virtually every chronic disease

Nutrition researcher gets funding to find out why diet affects immunityTwo decades ago, Catherine Field’s University of Alberta nutrition lab showed that specific fatty acids in breast milk during the crucial first period of life could program how the immune system responds to food allergens. Her group looked at milk, egg and soy allergies – the ones babies tend to grow out of but can still…
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