The HORROR! COVID-19 diagnosis could save Trump’s campaign

The entire Democratic Party strategy – to make the election a referendum on Trump – now lays on the floor, discarded

The HORROR! COVID-19 diagnosis could save Trump’s campaignIn another October, in another democratic contest, a man’s disability – a man’s health – almost changed everything. In October 1995, Quebec was voting in a second referendum on independence. The federalist side had been winning – until Quebec’s separatist premier passed control of the campaign to the younger and more popular leader of the…

Fracking can lift the Maritimes out of economic doldrums

Fracking can lift the Maritimes out of economic doldrumsThe economic recovery after the COVID-19 pandemic should include Nova Scotia and New Brunswick lifting restrictions on natural gas fracking. Natural gas prices are low but that won’t last forever. Energy industry observers say the natural gas supply glut existed even well before the pandemic. However, the oversupply problems seem to be worse for American…

Leslyn Lewis could be our next, next prime minister

Leslyn Lewis could be our next, next prime ministerIf the Conservative Party of Canada truly wanted to turn its party-of-angry-old-white-men image on its head, to herald a new era or principled conservatism, and to reach out to voters who have not considered them in the past, then members would choose Leslyn Lewis as their new leader. But they should not do that. This…

Let Quebecers decide the fate of a national pipeline

Confederation was designed as an economic union from sea to sea, linked by infrastructure that crosses provincial borders

Let Quebecers decide the fate of a national pipelineDuring the recent French and English language debates for the Conservative leadership, one of the two leading candidates accused the other of wanting to impose an oil pipeline on Quebec without its consent. Erin O’Toole, the Conservative MP for Durham, Ont., articulated his vision for a national energy corridor throughout Canada. He was then accused…

The soft tyranny of Quebec’s ongoing linguistic crossfire

Quebecers find themselves taking sides in language squabbles their better judgment says are irrelevant to life outside the political bubble

The soft tyranny of Quebec’s ongoing linguistic crossfireQuebec’s anglophones, francophones and allophones should all be on their smart phones demanding to know what in the name of Saint René Lévesque just happened in the National Assembly. “We are not a small people,” the late premier, Lévesque, famously said after his victorious Parti Quebecois stunned everyone on election night in 1976. “We are…