Canadian workforce aging: StatsCan

As baby boomers retire, the impact is being felt across all sectors in Canada, but some areas will suffer more

Canadian workforce aging: StatsCanCanada’s workforce is clearly aging, as is the country’s population. According to a report released on Thursday by Statistics Canada, in 1996 there were 2.7 workers aged 25 to 34 for every worker aged 55 and older. By 2018, the ratio declined to 1.0. “The aging of the workforce is mostly the result of the…

Albertans’ retirement income expectations highest in country

RBC poll says many Canadian baby boomers worry about a retirement savings shortfall

Albertans’ retirement income expectations highest in countryMany Canadian baby boomers worry about a retirement savings shortfall and Albertans have the highest expectations for how much they think they’ll need to save for retirement, according to a report released on Thursday by RBC. In a poll, Albertans surveyed said they think they will have to save $1.1 million for their retirement. The…

Confronting retirement with thought and planning

Give yourself some time to evaluate options. Be honest with your ego and let your imagination troll through deep waters

Confronting retirement with thought and planningA lot of my friends are retiring. And there are many retirement models being thought about, reviewed, argued and applied or avoided. But it doesn’t really appear to me that any of them were exhaustively analyzed before selection. In fact, many seem to be derived from previous family practice (i.e. what parents did), simply made…

Laundered money is a key cog in our economy

Canadians’ savings are sheltered and foreign investors are reluctant. Laundered money fills a crucial investment gap

Laundered money is a key cog in our economyYou could make a case that in the absence of illegal laundered money, there would be almost no risk investment capital in Canada. The problem with laundered money is huge. Recent estimates put the value of laundered money in Canada at $46.7 billion; other more realistic estimates have it in the range of $130 billion.…

One in five young Canadian boomers have no retirement savings

Franklin Templeton survey also says 22% of self-employed Canadians never intend to retire

One in five young Canadian boomers have no retirement savingsA survey released on Wednesday says 21 per cent of Canadian young baby boomers, aged 55 to 64, have not saved anything for retirement. Franklin Templeton's 2019 Retirement Income Strategies and Expectations (RISE) survey also found 46 per cent of Canadian young boomers would consider postponing retirement and 15 per cent of Canadians expect to…

Stretching out our work lives as lifespans extend

Authors describe an evolving economy that includes people working into their 80s, based on a life expectancy of 100 years

Stretching out our work lives as lifespans extendLiving to 100 years old used to be an amazing and rare accomplishment. Three-digit birthdays were worthy of a letter from Queen Elizabeth. But today’s children five years old or younger have a 50 per cent chance of making it to 100. This amazing fact is pointed out in a book by Lynda Gratton and…

Growing number of seniors lack support of family, friends

Unbefriended,’ these isolated seniors require more help to safeguard their access to basic daily needs, including companionship, and improve their quality of life

Growing number of seniors lack support of family, friendsBy Stephanie A. Chamberlain and Carole A. Estabrooks University of Alberta What happens when a person grows older and can no longer make health and financial decisions for themselves – but also doesn’t have family or friends who can make those decisions on their behalf? Health and social services use a hard-hitting term to describe…

Is your time at the helm of your business running out?

We need to be prepared and to have considered our options in the event our lives change unexpectedly

Is your time at the helm of your business running out?What would happen if you had to sell your business this week due to illness? A man recently contacted me because his doctors told him that due to an illness, he had to stop working immediately. The problem was that he owned a business. How, he asked, could he comply with his doctors’ orders and…

Finding our way through the work maze to retirement

Business leaders need to create a culture where everyone contributes with passion and where everyone can plan for their future

Finding our way through the work maze to retirementA girl recently told me she wants to quit her job – she doesn’t want to work any more or go to school. “It sounds like you want to retire,” I said. “What would you do with all your time?” “I might want to do some travelling or play basketball,” she said. “I really don’t…

Federal budget full of puzzling contradictions

With one hand, the government gives. With the other hand, it takes away benefits to taxpayers

Federal budget full of puzzling contradictionsBy Jason Clemens and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute Commentators have noted the thrown-together nature of the 2019 federal budget released last week. There seem to be several ill-considered initiatives and some parts of the budget openly contradict other government programs and reforms. One of the more prominent contradictions relates to housing policy. In 2016,…

Women more likely to put careers on hold to care for loved ones

CIBC study says 30% of women have reduced or stopped saving as a direct result of care responsibilities

Women more likely to put careers on hold to care for loved onesA new study by CIBC says 69 per cent Canadian women make significant financial sacrifices, including putting their careers on hold to care for loved ones, which can put them at a considerable disadvantage to men when it comes to saving for their retirement. The study also found that 30 per cent of women say they've…

You have not nearly seen everything yet

A 96-year-old mother’s invaluable experiences and insights help put today’s calamitous events in perspective

You have not nearly seen everything yetIt’s tempting to think when you hit your 60s that you’ve seen it all, that your analysis of contemporary issues is tight and complete. I’m here to say it ain’t. That’s because I’ve just checked in with my 96-year-old Mom, Frances Robinson, after being in Mexico for a couple of weeks, forgetfully without a phone…

The nomadic life of retirement tourism

Among the many fascinating people found in San Miguel de Allende was a couple who sold everything to travel the world

The nomadic life of retirement tourismI’ve just returned from San Miguel de Allende full of interesting new experiences gathered in a 475-year-old Mexican central highlands town renowned worldwide for its hospitality to culturally creative folk. Those visitors like to rent 300-year-old casas, practise speaking Spanish and participate in a nuanced cosmopolitan life. The local media refer to this phenomenon as…

Many Canadians regret retiring, try re-entering the workforce

CIBC poll says too many people approach retirement without a plan

Many Canadians regret retiring, try re-entering the workforceWhen is the right time to retire? As many Canadians get to the age where they’re contemplating their next steps in life, a new CIBC poll indicates 27 per cent of retired Canadians regret retiring and an almost equal number – 23 per cent – have tried re-entering the labour market. The poll, which was…

CPP takes bigger bite from Canadians

But much of the justification for expanding the pension plan is debatable or downright wrong

CPP takes bigger bite from CanadiansBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute Canadians likely noticed that their first paycheque of 2019 was slightly smaller than in 2018, even if they got a raise. The decline in after-tax income is because the first of several tax increases to finance an expanded Canada Pension Plan (CPP) took effect…
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