Finding our way through the work maze to retirement

Business leaders need to create a culture where everyone contributes with passion and where everyone can plan for their future

Finding our way through the work maze to retirementA girl recently told me she wants to quit her job – she doesn’t want to work any more or go to school. “It sounds like you want to retire,” I said. “What would you do with all your time?” “I might want to do some travelling or play basketball,” she said. “I really don’t…

Federal budget full of puzzling contradictions

With one hand, the government gives. With the other hand, it takes away benefits to taxpayers

Federal budget full of puzzling contradictionsBy Jason Clemens and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute Commentators have noted the thrown-together nature of the 2019 federal budget released last week. There seem to be several ill-considered initiatives and some parts of the budget openly contradict other government programs and reforms. One of the more prominent contradictions relates to housing policy. In 2016,…

Women more likely to put careers on hold to care for loved ones

CIBC study says 30% of women have reduced or stopped saving as a direct result of care responsibilities

Women more likely to put careers on hold to care for loved onesA new study by CIBC says 69 per cent Canadian women make significant financial sacrifices, including putting their careers on hold to care for loved ones, which can put them at a considerable disadvantage to men when it comes to saving for their retirement. The study also found that 30 per cent of women say they've…

You have not nearly seen everything yet

A 96-year-old mother’s invaluable experiences and insights help put today’s calamitous events in perspective

You have not nearly seen everything yetIt’s tempting to think when you hit your 60s that you’ve seen it all, that your analysis of contemporary issues is tight and complete. I’m here to say it ain’t. That’s because I’ve just checked in with my 96-year-old Mom, Frances Robinson, after being in Mexico for a couple of weeks, forgetfully without a phone…

The nomadic life of retirement tourism

Among the many fascinating people found in San Miguel de Allende was a couple who sold everything to travel the world

The nomadic life of retirement tourismI’ve just returned from San Miguel de Allende full of interesting new experiences gathered in a 475-year-old Mexican central highlands town renowned worldwide for its hospitality to culturally creative folk. Those visitors like to rent 300-year-old casas, practise speaking Spanish and participate in a nuanced cosmopolitan life. The local media refer to this phenomenon as…

Many Canadians regret retiring, try re-entering the workforce

CIBC poll says too many people approach retirement without a plan

Many Canadians regret retiring, try re-entering the workforceWhen is the right time to retire? As many Canadians get to the age where they’re contemplating their next steps in life, a new CIBC poll indicates 27 per cent of retired Canadians regret retiring and an almost equal number – 23 per cent – have tried re-entering the labour market. The poll, which was…

CPP takes bigger bite from Canadians

But much of the justification for expanding the pension plan is debatable or downright wrong

CPP takes bigger bite from CanadiansBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute Canadians likely noticed that their first paycheque of 2019 was slightly smaller than in 2018, even if they got a raise. The decline in after-tax income is because the first of several tax increases to finance an expanded Canada Pension Plan (CPP) took effect…

CPP contribution hikes penalize workers, dampen the economy

When the government makes employment more expensive, the sure result is fewer jobs

CPP contribution hikes penalize workers, dampen the economyThe federal government began 2019 by taking a bigger bite out of workers’ paycheques: the combined employer and employee Canada Pension Plan payroll tax rose from 9.9 per cent of earnings to 10.2 per cent. It’s the first of five annual payroll tax hikes. By the time the CPP tax hike is fully phased in, a…

Health care students from area receive scholarships

The Dr. Stewart Holmes Scholarship Fund hands out awards each year to students from communities in the retired physician’s area

Health care students from area receive scholarshipsKenneth Brown of The Clarion Students from Kindersley, Glidden and Eatonia are among the seven recipients of Dr. Stewart Holmes Scholarships in a special year for the retired physician. The 33rd annual Scholarship Tea was held on Nov. 17 at the former Eston Medical Clinic building. Of the seven recipients, three are from the Kindersley…

The secret to staying young

Longtime volunteer Bill Mullock says you need to keep working, putting your skills to good use

The secret to staying youngJoan Janzen of The Clarion Bill Mullock has been volunteering in some capacity for the past 30 years. During warmer months, he can be found helping his nephew on the farm, where he is the “go for” guy, going for this and going for that. During winter months, Bill helps out at the Salvation Army…

There is no reason to stop living at 65

Retirement is a choice, so get out there and get involved

There is no reason to stop living at 65We see them everywhere. Retired members of our community, all over town, enthusiastically engaged in activities. Either they are enjoying a game of golf or shopping at the mall; working in their gardens or swimming at the pool; sometimes taking the bus to an activity centre for a game of cards with friends. These are the…

Do intentional communities make retirement sense?

Picturing a idyllic rural setting with exercise, freedom, stimulation – and support as needed. All crafted to cater to seniors

Do intentional communities make retirement sense?My Mom is still teaching me life lessons in her 90s. Chief of these recently has been the creation of an intentional community in which to retire. After a year spent essentially nursing my father through his final days in a fashionable, for-profit Vancouver rest home, he died and she decided to move into an…

An old white man awakes to his privilege – and its power for good

I’ve become much more prone to analyze daily social situations on the grounds of age, ethnicity and gender

An old white man awakes to his privilege – and its power for goodBeing older (I’m 67 and increasingly told this is old), white and male is being pointed out more and more these days. In less than glowing terms. While Donald Trump is arguably the global archetype of the boomer personae I’m describing, the phrase “old white man” is getting more deliberate usage in different parts of…

Why we shouldn’t worry about wealth inequality in Canada

Age and accumulated wealth account for much of the discrepancy. And that's just normal life-cycle economics

Why we shouldn’t worry about wealth inequality in CanadaMuch ado about nothing. The title of the Shakespearean comedy comes to mind when I think about the attention devoted to wealth inequality in recent years. The left's (and much of the major media's) preoccupation with economic inequality is fundamentally misplaced and has diverted attention away from the real problems we face. For example, take…

CPP’s perpetual head start

Private pensions face regulatory burdens that the Canada Pension Plan does not

CPP’s perpetual head startBy Moin A. Yahya and Charles Lammam The Fraser Institute In 2016, in fulfillment of a campaign promise, the federal government reached an agreement with the provinces to expand the Canada Pension Plan. Consequently, mandatory CPP contributions from working Canadians will increase steadily between January 2019 and 2025. Expansion proponents have used many faulty claims…