Capital gains tax hike would cripple investment

Increasing the federal tax would be anti-investment, anti-entrepreneurship, anti-innovation and anti-green

Capital gains tax hike would cripple investmentBy Niels Veldhuis and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute At a time when the country faces momentous economic challenges, it’s hard to think of a more damaging policy than a capital gains tax hike. Yet rumours persist that prior to the COVID-19 crisis and economic downturn, that’s exactly what the federal government planned to do.…

Government debt piling up for Ontarians

Blame economic contraction due to COVID-19 and increased government spending at the provincial and federal levels

Government debt piling up for OntariansOntario’s provincial government now carries more net debt per person than any province except Newfoundland and Labrador. In a reversal of historical norms, Ontario carries significantly more debt – almost $4,000 more per person – than Quebec. Of course, debt (financial assets minus total liabilities) means interest payments. But Ontarians aren’t just responsible for interest…

Is Trudeau government abandoning energy sector?

Is Trudeau government abandoning energy sector?By Niels Veldhuis and Elmira Aliakbari The Fraser Institute After weeks of delay, the federal government finally announced its aid package for the energy sector. To say it’s underwhelming would be an understatement. More than anything, the package announced on Friday confirms that the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sees one of Canada’s most…

Many Canadians pay a great deal for ‘free’ health care

The amount we pay for health care through the tax system depends on family income and size

Many Canadians pay a great deal for ‘free’ health careBy Milagros Palacios and Bacchus Barua The Fraser Institute The fall federal election showed that politicians across the spectrum are happy to promise to spend more on our government-run health-care system. Whether the spending is for long-term care or pharmacare, the political solution to any health-care problem seems to be to pump more money into…

Slow economic growth is the new normal

Unnaturally high growth rates were driven by post-war reconstruction, the baby boom and rising female labour force participation

Slow economic growth is the new normalThe single biggest determinant of long-term economic well-being is the rate of economic growth, but our expectations for modern growth may be misplaced. The industrial era, since the early 19th century, has seen powerful economic growth and unprecedented increases in living standards. Growth rates reached their peak in the postwar economic boom from 1945 to…