Incidents of serious parasitic disease on the rise in Alberta

The province is now the North American hotspot for a rare, potentially fatal disease

Incidents of serious parasitic disease on the rise in AlbertaA rare parasitic infection imported from Europe continues to take root in Alberta. The province is now the North American hotspot for human alveolar echinococcosis (AE), which takes the form of a growth in the liver, causing serious and potentially deadly health complications. A recently published review of known AE cases in Alberta found 17 instances…

Alberta still pulling its economic weight despite hard times

Despite the gloomy reports emanating from its oil and gas industry

Alberta still pulling its economic weight despite hard timesBy Bruce Lantz Reporter Resource World Magazine Alberta’s economy has taken a beating in recent years, but it isn’t likely to receive the federal equalization payments enjoyed by other disadvantaged provinces. Equalization transfer payments are made by wealthier provinces to offset financial shortcomings in other parts of the country. The process is entrenched in the…

I have diabetes. Here’s why I’m glad I live in Alberta

Having access to the Alberta Diabetes Institute makes living with diabetes a little easier

I have diabetes. Here’s why I’m glad I live in AlbertaBy Gillian Rutherford Contributor Troy Media People like me who live with diabetes have a lot to celebrate. It was 100 years ago that insulin was discovered and purified by a group of Canadian scientists, including the University of Alberta’s James Collip. That discovery commuted the death sentence of a diabetes diagnosis into a life…

Research into memory could help treat people with PTSD

Could help to make PTSD memories less disturbing

Research into memory could help treat people with PTSDAltering traumatic memories in a way that eases their burden could be the key to treating survivors of post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders, according to one of the University of Alberta’s newest Canada Research Chairs (CRC). Peggy St. Jacques, a psychology researcher in the Faculty of Science and CRC in Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory,…

Augustana grad eager to share her love of the outdoors with others

Everyone should have the chance to connect with nature and understand its importance to our lives, Kate Corrigan believes

Augustana grad eager to share her love of the outdoors with othersKate Corrigan still has blister scars from backpacking up to the base of Mount Robson during a high school field trip, but it was that first trek that sparked a passion for the great outdoors. “For me, the outdoors is a place to disconnect, to reconnect. You’re away from the stress of work, school, social…

Referring to the Taiwan dispute as a “question” dehumanizing

Apologists for Chinese aggression are advocating the annexation of one of the most successful examples of democratization in modern times

Referring to the Taiwan dispute as a “question” dehumanizingTime and again in academic works, newspaper articles and public comments, the dispute in the Taiwan Strait, which stems from Beijing’s longstanding claims of sovereignty over Taiwan, has been referred to as the “Taiwan question” or, alternatively, the “Taiwan issue.” Whether by design or intellectual sloppiness, this designation of Taiwan – of Taiwan’s fate, in…

Covid’s cost in liberty lost

Nova Scotia’s authoritarian response to the pandemic

Covid’s cost in liberty lostBorn and raised in Halifax, I currently live in Munich, Germany. I have been monitoring the Nova Scotian response to the pandemic from abroad by reading the news and keeping in touch with family and friends. I write this article to lend some perspective on the pandemic through the lens of a Bluenoser living much…

Grad school experience leads to role fighting anti-Black racism

Grad school experience leads to role fighting anti-Black racismFor Evelyn Asiedu, graduate school was not just about finding her path as a scientist; it was also about finding her path as an activist against anti-Black racism. Asiedu, who will soon graduate with a PhD from the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, didn’t talk about her experience with racism during her first few years at…

Researchers attempting to document 30,000 years of climate history

Braved cold and wind during the first phase of a research effort to document changes atop Mt. Logan

Researchers attempting to document 30,000 years of climate historyA pair of University of Alberta researchers led a research expedition that braved nearly three weeks of unrelenting cold and wind during the first phase of a monumental multi-pronged research effort to document changes atop the world’s largest mountain. Alison Criscitiello, director of the U of A’s Canadian Ice Core Lab and researcher in the Faculty of Science,…

Scientists identify cause of devastating landslide in Chamoli, India

The February 2021 tragedy was caused by the collapse of more than 25 million cubic metres of rock and ice

Scientists identify cause of devastating landslide in Chamoli, IndiaThe catastrophic landslide that occurred in Chamoli, India, in February 2021 was the result of a worst-possible combination of rock and ice, according to a new study by an international coalition of scientists. On Feb. 7, 2021, Chamoli district in India’s Uttarakhand region was crushed by a massive slide of rock and ice – more than 25…

London murders wound us all

The killings demand empathy for the victims, but also renewed commitment to freedom of faith

London murders wound us allThe news from London, Ont. regarding a murdered Muslim family is horrifying. It is chilling even to write about a driver deliberately ramming his pick-up truck into a father, mother, grandmother, daughter, and son – leaving only the young boy alive but bereft of his family. The police-reported motivation behind the crime should make it…

Islet transplant patient 252: ‘A second chance at a better life’

Procedure developed at U of A guides islet cell transplants for people with Type 1 diabetes around the world

Islet transplant patient 252: ‘A second chance at a better life’Nina Greene’s diabetes was so hard to control, she had “Type 1 Diabetic” tattooed on her left wrist – a guarantee that emergency medical personnel could identify her illness quickly if she was found unconscious. Despite all her efforts to manage her diabetes, she wound up in hospital so often with high or low blood…

Volunteer mentors prepare students for a world beyond university

The support of volunteer mentors helps students built their confidence

Volunteer mentors prepare students for a world beyond universityAbigail Brodhead considers herself a quiet person, shy about striking up conversations and asking questions. So when the COVID-19 pandemic shelved the University of Alberta student’s in-person practicum in the spring of 2020, she was concerned about making a go of it online. “I worried about how I would take control of my own learning,” said Brodhead,…

Training industry-ready grads in growing field of SMART technology

Training industry-ready grads in growing field of SMART technologyUniversity of Alberta students will get cross-disciplinary, work-integrated learning in one of Canada’s fastest-growing industries, thanks to a major grant announced on Thursday. The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) has awarded $1.6 million to the U of A for the Sensory-Motor Adaptive Rehabilitation Technology (SMART) CREATE training program to train up to 120 graduate and…

The benefits from Big Pharma more obvious than ever

Why are we biting the hand that saved us?

The benefits from Big Pharma more obvious than everFor some people, no good deed deserves to be rewarded – at least not by making a profit, which they treat as if it were a dirty word. Even saving millions of lives, as pharmaceutical companies have undoubtedly done by delivering safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines to market in record time, is no excuse for…
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