Rather than defund the police, rethink its core functions

Less of an officer's time should be spent on functions that don’t involve protecting the public

Rather than defund the police, rethink its core functionsRising crime rates have required Canadian police forces to reconcile managing their budgets with fighting crime. It’s not an easy balance to strike. Yet there is a simple way to save hundreds of millions of dollars: re-think the division of labour for police. Modern police officers receive extensive training to carry out tasks requiring an…

Simulated, anonymized data could be key to health-care innovations

Synthetic data based on records ensures confidentiality

Simulated, anonymized data could be key to health-care innovationsA University of Alberta researcher is developing an inventive solution to a problem plaguing health-care research around the world: how to make data-driven decisions without compromising the privacy of personal medical records. Dean Eurich, professor in the School of Public Health, is academic lead on a project that has successfully created a “synthetic data” set that…

CUPE wants its weight in gold – paid for by the taxpayer

Union leaders in New Brunswick demanding nothing less than a 20 per cent raise over the next four years

CUPE wants its weight in gold – paid for by the taxpayerIt seems like nothing short of their weight in gold will satisfy CUPE union leaders in New Brunswick. Over the next four years, CUPE is demanding nothing less than a 20 per cent raise. This would cost New Brunswick taxpayers an extra $158 million per year once fully implemented. It would already be an unrealistic…

Leaders need moral courage now more than ever: Roméo Dallaire

Former UN force commander leading ‘critical conversations’ on mental impact of moral injury

Leaders need moral courage now more than ever: Roméo DallaireThe term “moral injury” is relatively recent in our understanding of trauma. When Canada’s Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire led United Nations peacekeeping troops in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi that took a million lives over 100 days, few Canadians beyond the military were aware of the severe psychological damage witnessing such moral atrocities…

Biomanufacturing partnership boosts Canada’s vaccine capacity

New partnership ensures vaccine makers now have an option to manufacture their products domestically

Biomanufacturing partnership boosts Canada’s vaccine capacityVaccine makers, medical researchers and pharmaceutical companies now have a new full-service option to get their products manufactured in Canada, thanks to a partnership announced this week. The U of A’s Alberta Cell Therapy Manufacturing (ACTM) facility has signed a memorandum of understanding with The Ottawa Hospital’s Biotherapeutics Manufacturing Centre (BMC) and BioCanRx, a Canada-wide research network to develop…

How did we make reconciliation about white folks?

Many of the educational efforts associated with reconciliation are targeted at non-Indigenous peoples

How did we make reconciliation about white folks?Something strange has been happening on the road to true reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission produced clear recommendations on how the country could shed the bitter legacy of Indigenous residential schools. Yet, following revelations about gravesites near formal residential schools, the process seems to have morphed into measures designed to serve…

Researcher keen to expand Oxford research on history of sexuality

New Banting postdoctoral fellow will explore the politics of sexual health through a literary lens

Researcher keen to expand Oxford research on history of sexualityAs with many expatriates, it took leaving home for Lloyd (Meadhbh) Houston to see their country with clear eyes. “I wanted to escape,” said Houston of the town of Holywood, in which they grew up, about 15 minutes from Belfast. “One of the things I was fleeing was the justified reputation for social conservatism that haunts Ireland,…

Brain molecule helps ‘wake up’ cells that could help tackle MS: study

Fractalkine molecule showing promise for treating certain neurodegenerative disorders

Brain molecule helps ‘wake up’ cells that could help tackle MS: studyAn immunological molecule called fractalkine can boost the production of brain cells that produce myelin, a key factor in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, according to recent research from the University of Alberta. Myelin is an insulating layer around nerves that is gradually worn away by inflammation in multiple sclerosis and similar diseases. Without this…

Space designers take flight to test bioengineered knee cartilage in low gravity

Device built by U of A team could help researchers learn how osteoarthritis develops

Space designers take flight to test bioengineered knee cartilage in low gravityMembers of a University of Alberta student club are walking on air after testing samples of bioengineered knee cartilage in a reduced-gravity experiment competition. Amira Aissiou and Kirtan Dhunnoo of the University of Alberta Space Design Group strapped themselves in and went for a wild ride in the Canadian Space Agency’s Falcon 20 parabolic aircraft to get a…

Four U of A researchers named to Royal Society of Canada

Innovators in women and children’s health, water safety, nutrition and archeology join ranks

Four U of A researchers named to Royal Society of CanadaWhy some are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease than others, even when taking into account life-modifying factors like smoking and exercise, boils down to developmental aspects that start in the womb, according to a global authority on vascular pathophysiology in the pregnancy complication of pre-eclampsia. “It sets the stage,” said Sandra Davidge, Distinguished University Professor in…

Exploring bee behaviour opens new career possibilities

Tianna Tanasichuk's internship was a chance to gain experience – not learn about herself

Exploring bee behaviour opens new career possibilitiesWorking in the sunshine, surrounded by the soft hum of a dozen beehives this summer, Tianna Tanasichuk couldn’t help thinking of her recently passed Métis great-grandmother. “Whenever I was working with the bees, I felt like if she was here, she’d be proud of me, knowing I took this risk, of trying to grow by…

How to reduce our emissions without penalizing rural regions

Policies should be fair for all Canadians, regardless of where they happen to live

How to reduce our emissions without penalizing rural regionsBy Miguel Ouellette Olivier Rancourt and Krystle Wittevrongel Montreal Economic Institute Reducing our greenhouse gas emissions is one of the big concerns of our age. The numerous diverging interests pitted against each other on this issue make it a real puzzler for policy-makers, though. After many years of public policies aimed at reducing GHGs, layered…

U of A ranked among world’s top 100 in research performance

Strength in agricultural, environmental and engineering research shows in latest NTU rankings based on scientific publications

U of A ranked among world’s top 100 in research performanceBolstered by a strong showing in agriculture, the University of Alberta landed in the top 100 of a world ranking that compares the scientific performance of universities based entirely on academic publications. According to the 2021 NTU Ranking, calculated by National Taiwan University, the U of A ranked 91st globally – up one spot over last…

Student-led academic journal showcases undergraduate research in arts

Crossings is the first to bridge undergrad research across all arts programs

Student-led academic journal showcases undergraduate research in artsA new student-led academic journal – peer-reviewed by students – has launched in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Arts to showcase some of the finest undergraduate work in the social sciences, humanities and fine arts. Called Crossings, the annual publication contains perspectives as varied as a Marxist critique of capitalist trends in the theatre, an…

Students help groups improve programs through evaluation

Week-long course leads to better impact for community groups and work-integrated skill-building for students

Students help groups improve programs through evaluationIt’s become a truism in business that you can’t manage what you don’t measure. That’s why students in the University of Alberta’s School of Public Health are keen to take a unique course that gives them hands-on experience helping community groups evaluate their programs. And it’s why those community groups are lining up to get the help.…
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