The compelling case against universal child care

The Quebec system offers an opportunity to dive deeply into outcomes. The results aren’t promising for children

The compelling case against universal child careAdvocates of state-run child care saw opportunity in the COVID-19 crisis. It’s an old idea but not a great one. Working parents returned home to care for their children, some able to continue paid work from home and others not. As a result, calls for universal child care grew louder than they had for 15…

It’s time Canada stopped protecting its dairy industry

Governments tend to forget about consumers when managing supply. Open trade to more cheese and challenge our farmers

It’s time Canada stopped protecting its dairy industryCheese heads – it’s what Canadians are called in many of the United States border regions. It’s because when many Canadians visit their American neighbours, they head straight to the nearest supermarket and buy cheese – and milk and eggs. Dairy and eggs are much more expensive in Canada than in the U.S., even when…

Why do we obsess over money?

Why do we obsess over money?In the days before credit cards, before microwave machines, before The Ed Sullivan Show broadcast across the night TV screens, bread was a dime, pop a nickel or less, and my grandfather worked for a mill in the Canadian great northwest. Years ago, I would visit my grandfather in his Richmond, B.C., apartment. We would…

Trudeau’s second carbon tax coming at worst possible time

Trudeau needs to go back to drawing board and come up with an environmental plan that doesn’t hammer taxpayers

Trudeau’s second carbon tax coming at worst possible timeBy Aaron Wudrick and Franco Terrazzano Canadian Taxpayers Federation Whenever Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wants to solve a problem, his solution can’t be to hit families and businesses struggling to get by with even more costs. Yet, that’s exactly the approach Trudeau is taking with his second carbon tax. As Postmedia columnist John Ivison reported,…

Cities’ push for new taxes divorced from reality

Alberta’s cities need to first tackle the cost elephant in the room: labour

Cities’ push for new taxes divorced from realityWe hear councillors offer nice platitudes about understanding the hardships Albertans are going through, but actions speak louder than words. And the recent push for new tax powers shows that big city councillors and mayors are divorced from the reality facing Alberta. In June, Red Deer council voted unanimously to back an Edmonton resolution calling…

A guaranteed annual income is complicated

Richard Nixon and Pat Moynihan had a plan to end poverty. In the end, it was far too complicated, and languished and died

A guaranteed annual income is complicatedWhether it’s called a guaranteed annual income or a universal basic income, this currently fashionable idea isn’t new. And the fact that it hasn’t happened yet is a tipoff to the associated complexities. One of the earliest proponents was an American right-winger. In 1962’s Capitalism and Freedom, libertarian economist Milton Friedman proposed what he called…

Your grocery bill is rising and Covid-19 will make it worse

It’s high time to evaluate the possibility of a guaranteed minimum income, for greater financial equity for all

Your grocery bill is rising and Covid-19 will make it worseEvery month, Statistics Canada reminds us that life is getting more expensive. But for food, the situation has been unique over the last few decades. Based on numbers released recently, the price of a typical grocery basket has increased by about 240 per cent since 2000. Some will think such a percentage is expected, given…

Feds should learn from Ontario’s green energy failure

But Ontario’s experience is being ignored and could lead to billions more spent and higher energy costs for Canadians

Feds should learn from Ontario’s green energy failureBy Elmira Aliakbari and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Gerry Butts, former principal secretary to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, is at the heart of a new group, the Task Force for a Resilient Recovery, which recently released a series of recommendations for massive investment in green projects. The recommendations seems to be influencing the prime…

New research reveals what makes condos sell

Construction and design features matter more to buyers than price or age of properties, engineering researchers find

New research reveals what makes condos sellPhysical features such as construction materials, interior finishes and air conditioning are better determinants of how well a condo sells than price or building age, according to a University of Alberta study looking to pinpoint design-related features that increase the probability of a condo’s sale. “We’re trying to provide a framework through which builders can evaluate…

An argument for a tax-cut led recovery

An argument for a tax-cut led recoveryThe focus on the federal deficit has rightly been on the staggering scope of emergency spending, but there has been much less talk about the other big part of the equation: government revenues have plunged due to the economic shutdown. Indeed, the federal government’s July fiscal snapshot revealed that the government expects a steep drop…

Sooner or later, we will pay for federal spending

Trudeau isn’t saying no new taxes; he’s saying we should continue to spend today and pay for it with taxes tomorrow

Sooner or later, we will pay for federal spendingBy Tegan Hill and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute Despite promising significant increases to already historically high spending, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently pledged there will be no new taxes. This rhetoric is simply false. To pay for today’s spending, the Liberal government must either tax today or defer tax increases to the future by…

Not using cash during COVID-19 could make you overspend

U of A experts offer tips on how to handle your money during the pandemic – including decontaminating bills and coins

Not using cash during COVID-19 could make you overspendMany businesses worried about COVID-19 contamination are touchy about taking cash, but the greater risk may be in overusing our plastic. Shoppers using credit or debit cards for every purchase instead of cash and coins will have to watch their spending habits, said Mike Maier, a financial expert with the Alberta School of Business at the University…

Here’s why things will never be the same at the grocery store

From online grocery shopping to home delivery to cooking with fresh ingredients to higher prices to fewer choices in stores

Here’s why things will never be the same at the grocery storeMore than five months into the pandemic, we can start to see how life will look on the other side. At the grocery store, some changes will disappear while others will stay with us for the foreseeable future. Food is getting more expensive everywhere, including Canada. We expect prices to increase by four per cent.…

Equalization rebate should go to Albertans, not the Alberta government

If the feds send the larger equalization rebate to Alberta, then it should be made out to the taxpayers who have been paying the bills

Equalization rebate should go to Albertans, not the Alberta governmentHere’s a fundamental point about equalization: the provincial government doesn’t pay for equalization, taxpayers do. Premier Jason Kenney is calling on the feds to increase the equalization rebate to the Alberta government to offset some of the impacts of the downturn. But any equalization rebate should go back to the Albertans who have been paying…
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