Pipeline obstructionism costing Canada billions

According to a recent Fraser Institute study, lack of pipeline capacity will cost Canadian oil producers $15.8 billion this year

Pipeline obstructionism costing Canada billionsBy Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute Canada’s need for new pipelines is critical. The recent decision by Kinder Morgan, one of the largest energy infrastructure companies in North America, to halt all “non-essential spending” on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion – which would run from Alberta, through British Columbia, to the coast…

Ottawa’s rules make health care worse

We’ve seen decades of policy paralysis, with provinces constantly under threat of penalty for exploring policy options

Ottawa’s rules make health care worseBy Bacchus Barua and Nadeem Esmail The Fraser Institute What makes health care in our country uniquely Canadian? It’s certainly not the goal to ensure universal access to care regardless of ability to pay. That goal is shared by at least 28 other high-income countries around the world. It’s certainly not that our universal health-care…

Investors steering clear of Canada’s energy sector

Uncompetitive policies and regulatory uncertainty are largely to blame

Investors steering clear of Canada’s energy sectorBy Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute Canada’s investment climate for the energy sector can be described as unfavourable, at best. Clearly, investors have reached their breaking point with Canada’s uncompetitive policies and regulatory uncertainty and are steering clear. The result is fewer Canadian jobs and lower economic growth. According to the most…

B.C. wants more rental units; will municipalities follow through?

New zoning powers for local governments will only meaningfully affect rental vacancy rates if cities streamline approval processes

B.C. wants more rental units; will municipalities follow through?The British Columbia government recently introduced legislation aimed at housing affordability, which – among other things – would grant municipalities the power to zone for rental-only housing, ostensibly to preserve and expand the supply of rental units in the province’s tightest housing markets. With Metro Vancouver’s vacancy rate consistently below one per cent, there’s a…

Unconditional basic income is a bad idea

Such a program would weaken the incentives to work for lower-income Canadians and people not strongly tied to the labour force

Unconditional basic income is a bad ideaBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute Almost 50 years ago, a Canadian Senate report declared that a basic income “is an idea whose time has come.” Ever since, the idea resurfaces every so often, with support that spans the political spectrum. Most recently, a Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO) report reinvigorated the debate…

Ontario Liberals, PCs both wrong on minimum wage policy

The better plan would be a work-based subsidy that provides a cash transfer to working families with incomes below a certain level

Ontario Liberals, PCs both wrong on minimum wage policyBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute The Ontario Liberals and Ontario Progressive Conservatives both recently announced how they intend to help the working poor if they win the June 7 provincial election. Unfortunately, neither party has the right policy for targeting those who need help the most. First consider the Liberal approach…

Surprise! There was no tax cut for middle-class Canadians families

When you add up the eliminated credits, you get a very different perspective on the total income tax changes

Surprise! There was no tax cut for middle-class Canadians familiesBy Charles Lammam, Jason Clemens and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute With tax season just behind us, many Canadians are realizing the full weight of the income taxes they paid in 2017. And some may wonder about the much-heralded middle-class tax cut promised by the governing Liberals. In reality, very few Canadian families received an income…

Federal infrastructure spending a mess of delays, misguided priorities

A mere 10.6% of the nearly $100 billion in new infrastructure spending is for trade and transportation

Federal infrastructure spending a mess of delays, misguided prioritiesBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute In 2015, Prime Minster Justin Trudeau’s government came into office on the promise of running small annual budget deficits of no more than $10 billion for three years. The intent was to finance new spending on infrastructure projects that would help improve the economy. That’s not…

CPP expansion will shrink available investment capital in Canada

CPP expansion could result in a reduction in domestic investment up to $114 billion from 2019 to 2030

CPP expansion will shrink available investment capital in CanadaBy Charles Lammam and Taylor Jackson The Fraser Institute Canada has a growing investment problem. Business investment (excluding residential structures like houses and condos) has dropped nearly 20 per cent since 2014. The level of business investment (as a share of the economy) in Canada is now second lowest among 17 advanced countries. Meanwhile, foreign…

Private care is an essential part of an effective health system

We should stop demonizing private clinics – and the patients who need them – and recognize that they're part of the solution

Private care is an essential part of an effective health systemLast month, on the heels of a new threat from the British Columbia government to fine doctors who accept private payment for treatment already covered by the government-run health-care system, a trial – initiated more than seven years ago by a private Vancouver clinic led by Dr. Brian Day – resumed. Day, a former head…
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