Biologists develop better way to identify individual animals at night

Will help answer questions related to population density, foraging patterns and more

Biologists develop better way to identify individual animals at nightBiologists and ecologists often need to identify individual animals in the wild to help answer questions related to population density, foraging patterns and more. But there’s an issue: many of the markers they use, such as tags with colours or numbers, are only clearly visible in daylight – which poses a challenge for studying nocturnal…

Program helps thousands of women see themselves in STEM careers

Women stay in STEM when they have confidence and a sense of community, WISEST proves

While there have been efforts to increase female representation in STEM, the data show there’s still more to be done. The likelihood of a girl enrolled in Grade 1 in Canada going on to receive a PhD in the sciences or engineering is one in 225. When you’re up against those odds, it can be…

Teachers must retake charge of their classrooms

It is the only way to ensure quality education

Teachers must retake charge of their classroomsProspective teachers learn a lot about individualized instruction in faculties of education. That’s because teachers are encouraged to personalize learning for each student as much as possible. To a certain degree, this makes good sense. An inflexible, cookie-cutter approach to education serves no one well. At the same time, the pendulum has swung so far…

How bugs and worms could help restore land after industrial use

‘A whole world under our feet’: soil dwellers offer a fuller picture of how reclamation efforts are working

How bugs and worms could help restore land after industrial useThe tiny creatures teeming in the dirt under our feet don’t seem important, but University of Alberta research is starting to unearth ways some of them could help measure land reclamation efforts. Invertebrates such as worms, mites, centipedes and beetles affect the soil, but they aren’t included in current criteria that help mining, forestry, oil…

Change will come if we stay true to our values

Set goals, follow principles, choose our attitudes and actions, and things have a way of turning out

Change will come if we stay true to our valuesThe mantra of American meditation expert Bill Harris is: “Let whatever happens be okay.” Harris was talking about the process of meditation, which can lead to tremendous inner peace. It can also put a person to sleep or even result in temporary discomfort. When meditating, any outcome is fine, though we may need some guidance…

Claims of systemic racism ignore historical realities

It is wrong to equate individual prejudice with state-sponsored discrimination

Claims of systemic racism ignore historical realitiesThe following is an excerpt from The Victim Cult: How The Grievance Culture Hurts Everyone And Wrecks Civilizations by Mark Milke. In this excerpt, Milke details how the “new” definition of racism from Ibram X. Kendi and others hollow out hard facts and reasoned analyses when a monocausal explanation – racism – is offered up…

Why is Canada’s chief archivist rewriting our history?

Has ordered a purge of documents that “may offend people”

Why is Canada’s chief archivist rewriting our history?Nikolai Ivanovich Yezhov was not a nice man but, for a time, he was an important one. He was a favourite of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin and was head of the NKVD, the Soviet Union’s secret police. He was responsible for the arrests, tortures and executions during his master’s Great Purge of 1936 to 1938.…

Rural physicians get to participate in cradle-to-grave medicine

Rural learning programs help medical students to become rural family physicians

Rural physicians get to participate in cradle-to-grave medicinePonoka family doctor Greg Sawisky grew up in Kelowna, B.C., before heading to the University of Alberta for medical school. After a couple of shadowing opportunities in Fort McKay and Stettler, he threw himself into the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry’s Rural Integrated Community Clerkship program and hasn’t looked back. “There is something so wonderfully…

Rural health-care services get boost from pharmacy students

Community connections and a wide scope of practice make an appealing mix for career opportunities

Rural health-care services get boost from pharmacy studentsFor rural communities, health care can be difficult to access. Throw in part-time clinic hours, winter weather or a global pandemic, and those accessibility challenges only become more apparent. But, in Alberta, many services that once required an appointment with a family doctor can now be provided by a pharmacist – including some prescriptions, referrals,…

Oldest human DNA ever found in Africa uncovered.

Archeological detective work reveals a rare find

Oldest human DNA ever found in Africa uncovered.A University of Alberta anthropologist has uncovered the oldest human DNA yet found in Africa, shedding new light on a period of ancient human history about which little is known. Banting post-doctoral fellow and bioarcheologist Elizabeth Sawchuk found skeletal remains of a middle-aged woman on her first dig in Africa 12 years ago as a…

Student-run welding workshop gives women, LGBTQIA+ maker space

Born out of frustration with a male-dominated industry, The Red Bench is as much about community building as welding

Student-run welding workshop gives women, LGBTQIA+ maker spaceWhen Mack (Mackenzi) Johnston withdrew from engineering studies at a previous university, she felt discouraged and uninspired. The obstacles she faced in the male-dominated industry seemed insurmountable at times, and the path to success murky at best. Buoyed by memories of working alongside her father in his garage as a youth, Johnston recalled how strong…

Seasons come and go, but where did they get their names?

Plants "spring" forth and leaves "fall" but what about the other two seasons?

Seasons come and go, but where did they get their names?Last fall when I looked out my door, most of the leaves had fallen, the nights were very chilly and there truly was frost on the pumpkins. Now, as the end of the winter season approaches, I thought again about the seasons and how they got their names. I simplistically thought I could come up…

Let’s be sure to teach our children critical thinking skills

They’ll need them

Let’s be sure to teach our children critical thinking skillsApparently, both the British Columbia ministry of education and the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation would rather not encourage the province’s students to develop and utilize their critical thinking skills. Better to just take the teachers’ truth in the classroom rather than discovering and understanding both sides (or all sides) of a contentious subject. Shame on…

We can’t hide our heads in the sand over racism

Ignore mistakes of the past or allow racist policies in the present and we embrace our own demise

We can’t hide our heads in the sand over racismThere has been a great deal of discussion in the American media about the teaching of critical race theory. Some states have passed legislation to prevent the discussion of this topic in schools, and others have similar bills before their elected assemblies. Michigan is one of these states, and I recently came across a document…

Public health researcher a lead author on global report on climate change

New graduate certificate program in climate change and health will prepare students to find solutions

Public health researcher a lead author on global report on climate changeAgricultural policy-makers, wastewater treatment engineers, crisis counsellors and allergists all have something in common, although they may not realize it. Whether it’s planning for food that isn’t as nutritious as it used to be, preventing new waterborne illnesses from infiltrating the water supply, treating traumatized residents returning after an emergency evacuation or helping patients with…
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