Access to medications shouldn’t depend on your job

We could give politicians the same medication coverage plans as food servers and see if that speeds up their deliberations about publicly-funding medications

Access to medications shouldn’t depend on your jobMembers of Parliament mulling options for publicly-funding medications will likely take their sweet time. There’s no rush for them because they already have the type of access to medications contemplated for other Canadians. While approximately three million Canadians don’t take medications as directed because of the cost, MPs and other lawmakers enjoy platinum medication plans…

Beware the botnet, the 21st century’s horror story

The Internet of things has made us all vulnerable to the malicious work of web warriors, who are intent on upending the computer-controlled world

Beware the botnet, the 21st century’s horror storyBy Brennen Schmidt ALEUS Technology Group and Allan Bonner Troy Media columnist In old TV comedies, soap bubbles from the washing machine rise up the basement stairs and fill the living room, or the oven keeps baking until the cake occupies the whole kitchen. This was funny before the Internet of things (IoT) meant that…

Building a passion for STEM studies among women and girls

Only 20 per cent of Canada’s post-secondary science, technology, engineering and mathematics students are female. That must change. Here's how to start

Building a passion for STEM studies among women and girlsBy Sen. Art Eggleton and Sen. Raymonde Saint-Germain We recently celebrated International Day of Women and Girls in Science – and there’s much to celebrate. But there’s much work to be done, as well. It’s a day to celebrate just how far we’ve come since Elsie MacGill, aircraft designer and Canada’s first female engineer, was…

Waiting for the next inevitable mass murder

Too many Americans love their guns too much to ever surrender them simply because a law says they must

Waiting for the next inevitable mass murderLast week saw yet another school shooting in the United States. It has led to the now predictable and oft-repeated reactions on all sides. The public and politicians alike offer prayers, condolences and, frankly, precious little else in the way of concrete plans of action. Highlighted are the always-poignant stories of isolated acts of sacrifice…

Sooner or later, we will turn away from oil

Part 2: Albertans can lead the next economic revolution by pioneering new energy enterprises

Sooner or later, we will turn away from oilShould Alberta be allowed to move its unrefined diluted bitumen to British Coumbia’s tidewater in Burnaby via pipeline and then quadruple tanker traffic through Vancouver harbour, the city that bills itself as the world’s greenest? And does the pipeline proponent, Kinder Morgan, have the permission of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, the unceded…

UCP: go back to school on proposed education reforms

The Alberta party’s proposal to increase funding for independent schools is unlikely to improve education in Alberta

UCP: go back to school on proposed education reformsBy Angela MacLeod and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Alberta’s United Conservative Party (UCP) recently released a host of policy proposals in advance of its annual general meeting in May. They included proposed reforms in education that are unlikely to achieve their goals and could make things worse. The proposals presume that Alberta’s kindergarten-to-Grade-12 education system needs…

Lost in the fog: climate manipulation is all too real

Don’t blame carbon emissions on weird weather. Corporations and governments have been changing the weather quite intentionally for decades

Lost in the fog: climate manipulation is all too real“How’s the weather?” is far more than a shallow conversation starter. It’s a serious issue. Many would be surprised to know that 100 years ago, the scientific interest in weather surpassed mere observation and advanced into outright modification. A brief survey of mainstream news reports and public documents in the United States confirms a largely…

Buildings must be the foundation of a green city

Building standards include energy balance and water use, health and well-being of occupants, pollution, transport, materials, waste and ecology

Buildings must be the foundation of a green cityBy Natalia Pryadilina, Roy Damary and Allan Bonner Densely-populated cities are good for the environment in many ways. Condominiums and apartment buildings are more efficiently and easily heated and cooled. Public transport systems move people using a smaller environmental footprint. Walking is healthy. Yet cities also bring noise and air pollution. They create heat islands as…

Prepping for the reality of privatizing Canada’s power utilities

The uncertain future of Puerto Rico's badly managed power utility (PREPA) should serve as a clear warning to several provincial governments

Prepping for the reality of privatizing Canada’s power utilitiesPublic power utilities from B.C. to Newfoundland have expanded enormously, adding copious debt to provinces. This has burdened consumers and businesses with increasingly high power bills and will eventually lower their standards of living. With unsustainable debts, the provinces are going to be in trouble and restructuring looms for these companies. What’s happening in Puerto…

Genetics strongly influence our predisposition to mental illness

It is becoming increasingly clear that our genes influence everything from our personality traits to specific psychiatric disorders

Genetics strongly influence our predisposition to mental illnessNature has been pitted against nurture for centuries. People have always pondered the question of whether human behaviour is primarily dictated by genetic hard-wiring or by our experiences and environmental factors. The debate has lasted so long because we know comparatively little about the functioning of the human brain. As a result, disorders of the…