The high cost of pipeline obstructionism in Canada

Our lack of capacity to cheaply transport crude is costing us billions. Policy-makers need to recognize the urgent need for pipelines

The high cost of pipeline obstructionism in CanadaBy Kenneth P. Green, Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute In recent months, Canadian crude oil prices have dropped relative to other international benchmark prices, costing the economy billions in foregone revenues. The recent increase in the Western Canada Select (WCS) price discount compared to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) is largely due to…

The plastic bag pollution paradox

At least 5.25 trillion plastic particles weighing 268,940 tons are floating in our oceans but we struggle to find packaging alternatives

The plastic bag pollution paradoxBy Sylvain Charlebois Atlantic Institute for Market Studies and Tony Walker Dalhousie University An increasing number of people are voicing concerns about our use of plastics day-to-day. Single-use plastics of any kind – such as grocery bags, cutlery, straws, polystyrene and coffee cups – are significant yet preventable sources of land and marine pollution. In…

A flicker of hope in Canada’s gloomy energy climate

B.C.’s proposed tax incentive plan for an LNG facility in Kitimat is a step forward. But more must happen to revitalize Canada's economy

A flicker of hope in Canada’s gloomy energy climateBy Kenneth Green and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute The British Columbia government recently announced it will provide a large tax incentive to promote the building of a natural gas liquefaction and export facility in Kitimat. The announcement is a bright spark in an otherwise gloomy environment for energy transport and export infrastructure. The Kitimat…

Clear and present danger to Canada’s prosperity

Tax and regulatory increases impair the willingness to invest in Canada. And that strikes at the heart of our economic health

Clear and present danger to Canada’s prosperityBy Jason Clemens, Milagros Palacios and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute The idiom “the straw that broke the camel’s back” describes a minor or routine action that causes a large and sudden reaction because of the cumulative effects of many other small actions. This might well describe the state of business investment and entrepreneurship in…

Self-inflicted socialist wounds crippling Canada’s economy

Justin Trudeau has Canada headed toward another fiscal calamity, through a series of policy decisions that mimic his father’s misguided choices

Self-inflicted socialist wounds crippling Canada’s economyLike father, like son, the old adage goes. It’s never been truer than in the case of former prime minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau and his son Justin, Canada’s current prime minister. The parallels start with an ideological attraction to communism. Pierre was asked for his views on democracy and communism, and stated that a one-party…

Turning investors – and prosperity – away at the door

The federal government's disinterest in private-sector investment and entrepreneurship is devastating for Canada's economy

Turning investors – and prosperity – away at the doorBy Jason Clemens and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute Confidence in Canada as a destination for business spending is in steep decline. Given the importance of business investment and entrepreneurship to prosperity, the federal government should be concerned. But by all accounts, they're not. The latest evidence of government disinterest comes in the form of last month’s…

Federal budget turned a blind eye to Canada’s economic challenges

Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s budget fails to address sluggish economic growth and declining business investment

Federal budget turned a blind eye to Canada’s economic challengesBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s 2018 federal budget does nothing to address serious concerns over Canada’s economic prospects or the challenges emerging from the United States. In some respects, the budget makes matters worse by continuing the government’s self-destructive policies of chronic deficit-financed spending and new taxes…

Canada’s phoney debate about carbon taxes

A carbon tax added on top of the various bans, subsidies and tariff we already have in place only worsens regulatory inefficiencies

Canada’s phoney debate about carbon taxesIn the Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership race, all four candidates hoping to replace Patrick Brown oppose carbon taxes, a centrepiece of Brown’s platform. The federal Conservative Party also opposes carbon taxes. Some commentators see this as a betrayal of Conservative free-market instincts because (supposedly) our choice is between inefficient bureaucratic regulation and the enlightened Liberal…

Pipe dreams: Taking pipeline obstructionism to a whole new level

B.C.’s government seems intent on crippling the Canadian economy and tearing apart inter-provincial relations

Pipe dreams: Taking pipeline obstructionism to a whole new levelThe B.C. government has thrown yet another wrench in the gears of the Canadian provincial comity with a declaration that it will create a new regulatory process for pipeline approval and restrict how much bitumen can be moved through pipelines into the province. The government, led by Premier John Horgan, also announced it will create…

Minimum wage hikes serving up uncertainty in food industry

A 32 per cent increase in the minimum wage in 12 months is simply irresponsible

Minimum wage hikes serving up uncertainty in food industryThis is turning into a very challenging year for the Canadian food industry. Recent Statistics Canada numbers indicate that grocers are in trouble. Food inflation is above two per cent for the first time since April 2016. This is typically good news for grocers, increasing their margins. But given major headwinds affecting the industry, grocers…
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