Fed’s per-person spending among highest in history

The main rationale of the added spending by the Trudeau government was to stimulate economic growth, an unnecessary goal

Fed’s per-person spending among highest in historyBy Jason Clemens and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute Much has been made of the federal government’s ramp-up in spending, particularly its multibillion-dollar infrastructure initiative, and the corresponding deficits and debt. What has been largely ignored is the historical context of such spending – an analysis made all the more timely by this year’s 150th anniversary of Confederation.…

Atlantic Canada’s golden opportunity for U.S. immigration

Tell them Atlantic Canada is building, and that they will be key players in the growth of Canada’s most beautiful region as it prepares for the 21st century

Atlantic Canada’s golden opportunity for U.S. immigrationAtlantic Canada should move quickly to capitalize on political and strategic uncertainty south of the border by identifying, seducing and recruiting some of the best and brightest Americans to relocate northward. Encouraging this migration should be the key element of a Canadian strategy shaped by Americans’ uneasiness about the new administration of President Donald Trump. For Atlantic…

Sinking the myth of dangerous West Coast oil tanker traffic

As a change in government looms in British Columbia puts the Kinder Morgan expansion project in jeopardy, we need to realize just how safe oil tankers are

Sinking the myth of dangerous West Coast oil tanker trafficThe expansion of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline system, to ultimately move Alberta crude oil by tanker through the Port of Vancouver, was a high-profile issue in the recent B.C. election. Liberal Premier Christy Clark agreed to support the federally-approved project in exchange for Ottawa’s commitment to a substantially upgraded emergency spill response plan…

Staking out the moral high ground in the energy debate

Othering can help understand energy discourse in Canada – and its tension and polarization – in a sector where natural sciences sensibilities ought to prevail

Staking out the moral high ground in the energy debateUnderstanding “othering,” a theoretical notion studied in the social sciences, could help the petroleum sector connect with Canadians. Othering is about declaring something or someone to be the ‘other’ and, in so doing, reduce that other’s ability to enjoy the same virtues to which you have laid claim. “Othering is the process of casting a…

Truth will triumph – but not without our help

As we embrace the truth of humanity's most horrific actions, hateful lies lose their power, we become enlightened and the path to a better world becomes clear

Truth will triumph – but not without our help“Truthfulness alone constitutes the spiritual discipline of the Kali Yuga,” the Hindu tell us. As we study the beliefs of our sisters and brothers, we realize how much we have in common – and how universal wisdom always points to truth. The Kali Yuga, the age of the goddess Kali, is a time of death and destruction,…

Brief encounters can change your perspective of others

Brief encounters, like taxi trips, help us make connections with those whose circumstances and experiences differ from ours, but with whom we share our humanity

Brief encounters can change your perspective of othersI usually avoid conversations with taxi drivers. Their job is to drive me, not talk to me. Once the mandatory pleasantries are over, I’m content with silence. A nod of the head, a thank you and perhaps a tip are all that’s required to conclude the encounter. While most of my cab rides have been…

Trudeau selling Canadians false bill of goods on infrastructure

Little of the federal government's new spending over the next decade is earmarked for projects that will actually improve Canada’s core infrastructure

Trudeau selling Canadians false bill of goods on infrastructureBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute You’d think the prime minister would be intimately familiar with one of his government’s signature policy initiatives. But a recent statement by Justin Trudeau suggests he’s detached from the details on Ottawa’s multibillion-dollar infrastructure plan. He told the House of Commons: “We’re going to continue to invest historic amounts in…

Saving the euro: Why Germany must bring back the mark

Germany must exit the increasingly dysfunctional eurozone to allow its other members to benefit from a cheaper euro

Saving the euro: Why Germany must bring back the markIt’s time for Germany to abandon the euro – to save the European Union. The euro is the official currency of the eurozone. It’s used by the institutions of the European Union (EU) and by 19 of its 28 members. It’s the currency of around 400 million people – the second most traded money and reserve…

Multinationals face new pressures in grocery stores

Consumers increasingly want fresh, unprocessed food. The middle of the store now sees less traffic and that’s clearly affecting sales for most grocery products

Multinationals face new pressures in grocery storesSkippy peanut butter and Dad’s chocolate chip cookies are gone from the Canadian marketplace. If you feel sad about seeing these iconic brands go, brace yourselves. It’s just the beginning. Within days, two major U.S.-based food multinationals pulled well-known brands from the Canadian market. Mondelez International discontinued the iconic Dad’s cookies and Hormel Foods pulled Skippy peanut…

China offers a lesson on financing infrastructure

China built 20,000 km of high-speed rail infrastructure without raising taxes or becoming indebted to international bond markets

China offers a lesson on financing infrastructureAs members of a developed western economy, Canadians think we know all about capitalism. And, obviously, we believe our way of doing things is the best – we have nothing to learn from countries like China. Or do we? How did a country with an emerging economy like China build 20,000 km of high-speed rail infrastructure without raising…

No reason why an activist can’t be a columnist

Yes, it’s possible to be a columnist and activist. So why couldn't the Toronto Star countenance Desmond Cole and his stand on police carding?

No reason why an activist can’t be a columnistI’ve been writing columns since 1996. It’s a craft in which individuals often possess strong opinions, varied interests, articulate ideas and healthy doses of intellectual curiosity. What about activism, in the political sense of otherwise? This particular trait, which seems a logical fit, is now a matter of dispute due to the curious case of…

A tempest in a cultural appropriation teapot

For the CBC and others, a joke about cultural appropriation is more important than, you know, things like real racism

A tempest in a cultural appropriation teapotAll novelists are liars. Thieves, too. So said the late Mordecai Richler. My friend and I were in the dark at the back at the Bovine Sex Club on Queen West, waiting to see the Minneapolis punk band Off With Their Heads. My friend had just told me the story of how, years ago, he…

What’s the big deal about volunteer work?

Our society is filled with organizations that need volunteer help. And it is both fun and ennobling working for the common good

What’s the big deal about volunteer work?I keep hearing from older volunteers that it’s getting harder to find younger folks to volunteer for civil society board work. When I tell people I’m on five boards, I often get asked, “Why do you do it?” Even my almost-95-year-old mother asks, “Do they pay you for all the volunteering you do?” I have…

Why NAFTA and Canada are important to the U.S. economy

An open letter to President Trump from the Business Council of British Columbia as the U.S. prepares to renegotiate NAFTA

Why NAFTA and Canada are important to the U.S. economyDear President Trump: The Senate’s recent confirmation of Robert Lighthizer as the new United States trade representative signals that the work to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) will get under way soon. Against that backdrop, we hope you and your cabinet will keep in mind a number of important facts regarding the…

Generation X the lost food generation

Generation Xers grew up in an era when food was functional and boring. As a result, many don't cook and have little interest in the culinary culture

Generation X the lost food generationGeneration Xers don’t cook. They never acquired the skills. Most of this group (born between 1965 and 1976) grew up when food was essentially an afterthought. Different generations have different relationships with food and cooking. Recent studies show that baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) have time to cook and most do. Millennials (born between 1977…