Shove EDC off taxpayers’ shoulders and into the private sector

Canada's export credit agency is good at what it does. But part of that is taking risks with taxpayers’ money. It's time for that to end

Shove EDC off taxpayers’ shoulders and into the private sectorExport Development Canada (EDC) has a big problem – the kind of problem Crown corporations have no business courting. Canada’s export credit agency, EDC loaned Turquoise Hill Resources, a mining company, $1 billion. Unfortunately, Turquoise Hill allegedly transferred a considerable amount of money offshore to minimize the taxes it pays in Canada. EDC’s mission is…

Insurance Corp. of B.C. faces uncertain future

Canada’s only mandatory insurance provider is digging a deep financial hole and the B.C. government is looking for answers

Insurance Corp. of B.C. faces uncertain futureIt’s no secret that the Insurance Corp. of British Columbia (ICBC) is under financial distress. But should it be saved? In 2016-17, it suffered its largest loss ever – $889 million, an amount equal to 18 per cent of its total premiums. What’s worse, it’s heading for an even larger $1.3 billion loss this year,…

No ray of sunshine in Alberta’s fiscal forecast

Rachel Notley seems intent on duplicating the deep-diving debt performance of former Ontario NDP leader Bob Rae

No ray of sunshine in Alberta’s fiscal forecastBy Ben Eisen and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute When Rachel Notley’s NDP shook Alberta’s political landscape by winning a majority government in 2015, the similarities to the Ontario’s Bob Rae-led NDP government in the 1990s were striking. Both cases marked the first NDP government in provincial history, and both brought an end to Progressive…

Alberta crushed beneath a growing mountain of debt

The slow path to balance means the province will continue adding debt by the bucketful for many years, penalizing future taxpayers

Alberta crushed beneath a growing mountain of debtBy Ben Eisen and Steve Lafleur The Fraser Institute The Alberta government’s 2018 budget figures would be shocking if Albertans weren’t already accustomed to such numbers. The operating deficit is expected to be $8.8 billion in 2018-19, down slightly from its peak of $10.8 billion two years ago. It’s difficult to contextualize such a large…

Alberta’s fiscal fiasco threat to future generations of Albertans

Despite an improving economy, the provincial government still projects $9.1-billion deficit

Alberta’s fiscal fiasco threat to future generations of AlbertansBy Steve Lafleur and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute The Alberta government recently released its third-quarter fiscal update. While the update contains some good news about the economy, the outlook for provincial finances remains dire. The government expects a $9.1-billion deficit this fiscal year and it has no intention of balancing the budget until 2023-24. First, the…

Federal budget turned a blind eye to Canada’s economic challenges

Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s budget fails to address sluggish economic growth and declining business investment

Federal budget turned a blind eye to Canada’s economic challengesBy Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s 2018 federal budget does nothing to address serious concerns over Canada’s economic prospects or the challenges emerging from the United States. In some respects, the budget makes matters worse by continuing the government’s self-destructive policies of chronic deficit-financed spending and new taxes…

Balancing Alberta’s budget by 2023-24 isn’t good enough

Albertans have more debt, continued reliance on volatile natural resource revenue and higher taxes to look forward to

Balancing Alberta’s budget by 2023-24 isn’t good enoughBy Steve Lafleur and Ben Eisen The Fraser Institute The Alberta government’s large and persistent budget deficits remain one of the most important policy problems facing the province. This year, the province expects another deficit of more than $10 billion and forecasts call for a nearly identical deficit next year. The government of Premier Rachel Notley is…

Will Trudeau keep his promise to balance the budget?

He can, by following in Jean Chretien's footsteps and finding savings through a comprehensive review of its programs

Will Trudeau keep his promise to balance the budget?By Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre The Fraser Institute The federal government can start now to make good on its promise to balance the budget by 2019-20. All it will take is relatively modest spending reductions in the budget to be delivered on Tuesday – and the will to make them happen. During the 2015…

Prepping for the reality of privatizing Canada’s power utilities

The uncertain future of Puerto Rico's badly managed power utility (PREPA) should serve as a clear warning to several provincial governments

Prepping for the reality of privatizing Canada’s power utilitiesPublic power utilities from B.C. to Newfoundland have expanded enormously, adding copious debt to provinces. This has burdened consumers and businesses with increasingly high power bills and will eventually lower their standards of living. With unsustainable debts, the provinces are going to be in trouble and restructuring looms for these companies. What’s happening in Puerto…

Upcoming government budgets must focus on competitiveness

Canadian governments have done nothing to signal to investors, entrepreneurs and businesses that they have a plan to return the country to competitiveness

Upcoming government budgets must focus on competitivenessBy Jason Clemens and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute Canada has become a less appealing place to do business. So as we approach budget season, governments across the country must start paying attention to competitiveness. Higher taxes, new regulations, and uncertainty over access to foreign markets have reduced Canada’s attractiveness to entrepreneurs and businesses. Indeed,…
1 2 3