CPP contribution hikes penalize workers, dampen the economy

When the government makes employment more expensive, the sure result is fewer jobs

CPP contribution hikes penalize workers, dampen the economyThe federal government began 2019 by taking a bigger bite out of workers’ paycheques: the combined employer and employee Canada Pension Plan payroll tax rose from 9.9 per cent of earnings to 10.2 per cent. It’s the first of five annual payroll tax hikes. By the time the CPP tax hike is fully phased in, a…

Will Canada break up over carbon dioxide?

The federal government and oil-and-gas producing provinces are on a collision course and Alberta may well quit Confederation

Will Canada break up over carbon dioxide?Countries have broken up for very serious reasons: slavery, religion and ethnic tensions, for example. But no country has ever been at risk of breaking up because of a harmless gas like carbon dioxide. Canada could, thanks to an ideologically-driven federal government. Carbon dioxide makes up a tiny portion (.04 per cent) of our atmosphere…

Federal funding is ending but frailty still matters

New Frontiers in Research Fund supported valuable, long-term work. The program replacing it leaves huge gaps

Federal funding is ending but frailty still mattersBy Russell Williams and John Muscedere The federal government has announced the end of funding for its Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) program. This is not good news for Canadians. The program has long been touted as the jewel of the federal government’s sciences research support – and programs around the world have been…

Ottawa’s venture-capital handouts offer no positive economic value

When organizations are heavily regulated, funded by taxpayers and unlikely to shoulder losses, they’re private in name only

Ottawa’s venture-capital handouts offer no positive economic valueIf buzzwords were the path to prosperity, Canada would be growing like gangbusters. But it’s not. And the federal government’s Venture Capital Catalyst Initiative (VCCI) – with an expansion announced in Ottawa’s recent economic statement – is a case of lofty words anathema to efficient and healthy capital markets. Once we peel off the feel-good wrapper of innovation…

Why Canadians should embrace the yellow jacket movement

Some Canadians and French believe that their ‘leaders’ are mere followers of a supra-national agenda, not champions for their electorate

Why Canadians should embrace the yellow jacket movement“Canadians do not need to be liberated,” said Canadian Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson half a century ago, after French President Charles De Gaulle lit the fuse for Quebec independence with his famous “Vive la Quebec libre!” speech. But neither of their current counterparts are standing for national freedom, let alone calling for it. President…

Will Trudeau 2019 follow in the footsteps of Trudeau 1972?

Pierre Trudeau lost favour with voters and ended up with a minority government. A similar fate may await his son

Will Trudeau 2019 follow in the footsteps of Trudeau 1972?There are obvious similarities between the political situation of Justin Trudeau in 2019 and that of his father in 1972. In 1972, Pierre Trudeau’s personal magic wasn’t as alluring as during the heady days of 1968’s Trudeaumania. The same can be said for today’s prime minister vis-à-vis 2015. The 1972 election caught people by surprise.…

The biggest political story of the year in the Great White North

When Ontario Premier Doug Ford slashed the size of Toronto city council, he involved the judiciary and flirted with a controversial federal law

The biggest political story of the year in the Great White NorthWhat was Canada’s biggest political story of 2018? In my opinion, when all four levels of government were briefly involved in one small area of public policy debate. It started when Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservative government announced on July 27 that it would decrease the number of city council seats in Toronto from…

Legislation to ensure pay equity for work of equal value falls flat

Only a free market will balance out pay inequities. If a company fails to compensate fairly, employees will simply move on

Legislation to ensure pay equity for work of equal value falls flatFrom conception to implementation, pay equity is a sham. It’s obscured in double speak, packaged in seemingly laudable goals and promises great results. However, it can’t deliver them because it’s based on false premises. Any good that comes of it is far outweighed by the harm. That’s why Canadians should be wary of any legislation…

Not all cannabis candies are created equal

Health Canada offers a framework for the sale of edible cannabis products before the October 2019 launch. Will we be ready?

Not all cannabis candies are created equalYou think October 2018 was complicated, wait until edible cannabis products are legalized by October 2019. It’s just a matter of time before the edible market represents the majority of the cannabis market in Canada. A study released last year suggested that 93 per cent of consumers supporting Ottawa’s legalization plans would try a cannabis-infused food…

The practical limitations and realities of government

Recognizing those limitations and realities will result in a more effective, focused government that uses taxpayer resources more wisely

The practical limitations and realities of governmentBy Jason Clemens and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute There’s a gap, some might say a chasm, between what advocates for new and expanded government programs imagine government can achieve versus the day-to-day reality of government. Recent Canadian history provides no shortage of examples of ambitious, imaginative initiatives for government. The current federal government, for…

A hurtin’ song for Albertans – and a wakeup call to the nation

If the rest of Canada won’t listen to other forms of conversation about the importance of the energy sector, how about a song?

A hurtin’ song for Albertans – and a wakeup call to the nationThings have devolved into such a state of ridiculous zaniness on Canada's energy scape that perhaps it's time to express our travails through that time-proven panacea for all forms of hurt: the country and western song. Such songs can timelessly and eloquently express a range of sentiments and emotions. They’re anthems to spirit, grittiness and…

Backdoor access to encryption threatens the privacy of us all

Will government agencies respect our privacy and work in our best interests? Will access fall into the wrong hands?

Backdoor access to encryption threatens the privacy of us allCanada's spy agencies want access to your encrypted communication – and they have a ploy to get it without going through Parliament. Australia is where the action is taking place, since that country has fewer constitutional protections for privacy. The 2018 Assistance and Access Bill would force tech companies such as Wickr and Telegram to…

Feds investing $1.6 billion in Canada’s oil and gas sector

Money intended to ‘protect jobs and restore competitiveness during this difficult time’

Feds investing $1.6 billion in Canada’s oil and gas sectorThe federal government announced 0n Tuesday in Edmonton more than $1.6 billion to support jobs and workers in Canada’s oil and gas sector “as Canada seeks to diversify export markets for its resources beyond the United States.” The announcement was made by federal Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi and International Trade Diversification Minister Jim Carr.…

The Canada option: is it still viable for Alberta?

Separation has become a real possibility thanks to the abuses and injustices imposed by Ottawa

The Canada option: is it still viable for Alberta?In the past couple of weeks, a retired senior oil executive, Gwyn Morgan, a former premier of Saskatchewan, Brad Wall, and a veteran journalist, Don Braid, all commented publicly on the current position of Alberta in Canada. They agreed on the nature of the problem, but stopped short of suggesting the obvious response. It’s not…

Athabasca Oil chopping 25% of head office staff

The sector is still a long ways away from permanent solutions, says company president Robert Broen

Athabasca Oil chopping 25% of head office staffAthabasca Oil Corp. announced on Tuesday that it has undertaken a number of actions to enhance its competitiveness and resiliency. It has introduced a streamlined corporate cost structure that consists of a 25 per cent reduction in head office staff effective immediately and 10 per cent rollback in salaries for executives and directors. The company did…
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