Study challenges the link between obesity and junk food advertising

Banning junk food advertising may have little effect on reducing obesity

Study challenges the link between obesity and junk food advertisingA new study from the University of Alberta challenges the notion that advertising junk food is at the root of the obesity epidemic. Growing up in a low social-economic environment is more of a precursor to obesity later in life than junk food advertising, according to the report, with adults who grew up in a…

Clot-busting drug used for heart attacks effective in treatment of stroke

Could become the standard treatment for acute ischemic stroke

Clot-busting drug used for heart attacks effective in treatment of strokeTenecteplase (TNK), a common clot-busting drug used in people suffering from a heart attack, is a safe and effective treatment for those in the midst of acute ischemic stroke, reports a University of Alberta research team involved in the largest stroke clinical trial in Canadian history. Brian Buck, a neurology professor in the University of…

U of A receives $48.3 million in provincial funding to expand enrolment

Funding will allow for 2,000 more students in the next three years

U of A receives $48.3 million in provincial funding to expand enrolmentWith a focus on high-demand programs to meet Alberta’s emerging labour market needs, the provincial government has announced an investment of $48.3 million in the University of Alberta. The funding is part of the $171-million Targeted Enrolment Expansion program for post-secondary institutions, announced in February during the unveiling of the 2022-23 provincial budget. U of…

Discovery offers new clues to lichens’ evolutionary advantage

New research challenges understanding of organisms that have been textbook cases since late 1800s

Discovery offers new clues to lichens’ evolutionary advantageOur understanding of the marriage of fungus and algae in the formation of lichen is being upended by a University of Alberta research team whose work is rewriting the biology that introduced symbiosis to the world. “New discoveries happen with symbiosis all the time, but the exciting thing here is this is the symbiosis that…

Why the world won’t sanction Russian oil

A post-pandemic world clamouring for raw energy mean Russian oil is here to stay

Why the world won’t sanction Russian oilWhen U.S. President Joe Biden took to the podium in the first hours of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, he spoke of a blitz of sanctions designed to isolate and cripple the Russian economy, and ultimately stall the Russian war machine. Noticeably absent from the long list of deterrents – which even included personalized financial…

Grazing mirroring natural patterns protects grasslands from drought

Research could help ranchers adapt to climate change and preserve vital ecosystems

Grazing mirroring natural patterns protects grasslands from droughtRanchers who frequently rotate cattle between fields – resembling how bison once moved across Canada’s prairie – build drought resistance into Western Canada’s grasslands, according to a series of University of Alberta studies designed to find ways to improve the net carbon balance of grazed grasslands and nurture more resilient landscapes. “The way we manage…

Study shows most efficient ways to capture invasive lionfish

Diving at dawn and dusk could save time and money in battle against the voracious predators

Study shows most efficient ways to capture invasive lionfishAlthough time is in short supply in the war against the lionfish invasion in the Atlantic and Caribbean, a University of Alberta study suggests taking time to plan the where, when and who of this fight will give wildlife officials the best shot at keeping the voracious trespassers at bay. “Many invasive species removal plans…

Alberta-based Quantum Silicon Inc. is ushering in the future of electronics

Manufactures atom-scale circuits that are faster and use far less energy

Alberta-based Quantum Silicon Inc. is ushering in the future of electronicsThe discovery that silicon could be used to make transistors smaller and more efficient in the late 1950s led to the invention of the integrated circuit – the basis for computers, cellphones and just about every other electrical device in use today – and signalled the dawn of the largest, most complex industry history has…

Promising chemotherapy treatment for bladder cancer enters human trials

A rejected patent application nearly derailed years of research, but support from experts saved the day

Promising chemotherapy treatment for bladder cancer enters human trialsIn 2015, University of Alberta cancer researcher Jack Tuszynski learned that his patent application for a promising chemotherapy treatment for people suffering from metastatic bladder cancer had been rejected by the U.S. Patent Office. “That was it. I thought, ‘We can’t proceed, we’re done, we spent almost a decade working on this and it’s a no go,’”…

Six University of Alberta students to receive the Schulich Leader Scholarship

Schulich Leaders put their love of technology to work solving problems

Six University of Alberta students to receive the Schulich Leader ScholarshipKevin Uzomechine says his fascination with technology began as a youngster transfixed by the brief static blue text on his TV set that read “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.” By the time the large blocks of unabashed yellow text had crawled vertically up through the screen to Star Wars’ signature trumpets, the…

Business grad manages all-star performance in school and sports

From penalty kicks to the Academic All-Canadians, Kiera Fujimoto was a clutch player on the soccer pitch and in the classroom

Business grad manages all-star performance in school and sportsThe second-last time former University of Alberta Pandas midfielder Kiera Fujimoto took a penalty kick to decide a meaningful soccer game, she was a member of an under-15 Team Alberta playing in the final of the All-Star National Championship in Ontario. Unfortunately, her miss as the seventh shooter resulted in a loss in the final.…

Regular exercise may help expecting moms stave off depression

Study suggests following physical activity guidelines could help a vulnerable group that is bearing the brunt of social isolation

Regular exercise may help expecting moms stave off depressionNew moms and pregnant mothers-to-be who were physically active in the early days of the pandemic had a 30 per cent less chance of experiencing depression, according to a study that also shows this already vulnerable group continues to bear the brunt of the isolation measures. “It’s not like it was a big shock that…

Researchers pinpoint where wildlife most likely to be killed by trains

Reducing speed limits outside towns of Banff and Lake Louise could mean fewer fatal collisions, study suggests

Researchers pinpoint where wildlife most likely to be killed by trainsThe number of mammals killed by trains in Canada’s Rocky Mountains could be slashed if the railway reduced speed limits along eight km total of track on either side of the Banff and Lake Louise townsites, according to a study by University of Alberta researchers who used the train mortality record to pinpoint the most dangerous…

Recreational sport helps people cope with adversity, study shows

Social support in rec leagues builds confidence and offers a reprieve from negative emotions, researcher finds

Recreational sport helps people cope with adversity, study showsBesides the physical fitness and social benefits of sport, recreational athletes use their sport participation as a way to cope with adverse life events, according to a University of Alberta study. The study could help adult sport associations better market and reshape their leagues to combat shrinking participation rates. “It’s not surprising that these recreational…

Lack of online access a barrier for athletes with disabilities

Vast majority of athletics websites make it hard for people with disabilities to see themselves participating in sport, U of A researcher finds

Lack of online access a barrier for athletes with disabilitiesDespite overtures to the contrary, para-athletes remain largely invisible within the vast majority of Canadian athletics websites, according to a University of Alberta study showing access to sport for people with disabilities is all but completely missing online. Danielle Peers, a professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation and Canada Research Chair in Disability and…