Reclaim brownfield sites by putting science funding to practical use

The payoffs from investing more in applied research collaboration among different kinds of institutions are practical and long-lasting

Reclaim brownfield sites by putting science funding to practical useThere are tens of thousands of brownfield sites scattered across Canada – many of them in urban locations. Enter collaborations with applied research. And a Canadian-made solution. Outstanding discovery research occurs at universities across the country. However, far too often this research fails to arrive at the commercial marketplace. Consecutive federal governments have attempted to tackle…

Canada’s phoney debate about carbon taxes

A carbon tax added on top of the various bans, subsidies and tariff we already have in place only worsens regulatory inefficiencies

Canada’s phoney debate about carbon taxesIn the Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership race, all four candidates hoping to replace Patrick Brown oppose carbon taxes, a centrepiece of Brown’s platform. The federal Conservative Party also opposes carbon taxes. Some commentators see this as a betrayal of Conservative free-market instincts because (supposedly) our choice is between inefficient bureaucratic regulation and the enlightened Liberal…

Time to get serious about water quality in First Nation communities

Solving this seemingly intractable problem should be quite simple, but simply increasing funding will only make the problems worse

Time to get serious about water quality in First Nation communitiesPondering the crisis so many First Nations communities face over water quality, you can’t help but think of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge: “Water, water, everywhere, Nor any drop to drink.” The ironic dilemma of the mariner is obvious in more than 90 per cent of Canada’s First Nations communities. Most…

Is Ottawa really committed to new resource development?

It's doubtful. Its plan to “improve” the NEB actually makes it more difficult and costly for business to navigate

Is Ottawa really committed to new resource development?By Kenneth Green and Ross McKitrick The Fraser Institute The federal government recently announced its plan to “improve” the National Energy Board. The language of the announcement is all “sunny ways,” promising to be all things to all stakeholders. But the promises are incompatible. The announcement says the new approval process for major energy projects will…

Pipelines are crucial to national prosperity

The battle between Alberta and B.C. over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion has broad implications for all Canadians

By Steve Lafleur and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute The governments of Alberta and British Columbia are waging an intense trade dispute over the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which would run between Edmonton and Burnaby. But the implications extend far beyond those two provinces. The details of the feud have been well-documented. After B.C.’s…

China’s foreign garbage ban reveals recycling’s weakness

Recycling seems like a neat solution until we can't dump our garbage on another country and have to deal with it ourselves

China’s foreign garbage ban reveals recycling’s weaknessChina has decided that what goes around doesn’t have to come around – at least not around there. As 2017 came to an end, China stopped importing most recyclables, putting Canadian recyclers in a bind. The Chinese decision also revealed weaknesses in the basic premise of recycling. Many environmentalists regard recycling as imperative for the…

Sooner or later, we will turn away from oil

Part 2: Albertans can lead the next economic revolution by pioneering new energy enterprises

Sooner or later, we will turn away from oilShould Alberta be allowed to move its unrefined diluted bitumen to British Coumbia’s tidewater in Burnaby via pipeline and then quadruple tanker traffic through Vancouver harbour, the city that bills itself as the world’s greenest? And does the pipeline proponent, Kinder Morgan, have the permission of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, the unceded…

Lost in the fog: climate manipulation is all too real

Don’t blame carbon emissions on weird weather. Corporations and governments have been changing the weather quite intentionally for decades

Lost in the fog: climate manipulation is all too real“How’s the weather?” is far more than a shallow conversation starter. It’s a serious issue. Many would be surprised to know that 100 years ago, the scientific interest in weather surpassed mere observation and advanced into outright modification. A brief survey of mainstream news reports and public documents in the United States confirms a largely…

Eat more plants, less meat – improve your health and save the planet

Canada’s Food Guide revamp is good for people and the planet, thanks in great part to a new information-gathering process

Eat more plants, less meat – improve your health and save the planetBy Courtney Howard Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment and Ian Culbert Canadian Public Health Association What is a healthy diet? New Year’s diet conversations still abound around water coolers Canada-wide as people debate the merits and shortcomings of sugar, gluten, meat, dairy, tofu and other edibles. Scientific articles, shiny celebrities and representatives of…

Former MLA pleads guilty to environmental charges

The charges against Bill Boyd are related to the altering of shoreline, wildlife habitat and ecological land along a stretch of the South Saskatchewan River

Former MLA pleads guilty to environmental chargesKenneth Brown of The Clarion Former Kindersley MLA Bill Boyd has pleaded guilty to charges under provincial wildlife and environmental acts, and has signed orders to remedy the damages. Boyd was at provincial court in Kindersley on Feb. 6 before Judge Robert Jackson. Robert Ard, Boyd’s defence lawyer, entered guilty pleas to two charges but…

Stuck in traffic: why won’t Vancouver embrace Uber?

The benefits of ride-hailing services are many, for both individuals and communities. So what's the holdup in B.C.?

Stuck in traffic: why won’t Vancouver embrace Uber?In a well-functioning city, we’ve long taken certain things for granted. We expect law and order, and a reasonable degree of safety. Drinkable water should flow from the taps. A reliable supply of electricity should ensure the lights stay on. Traffic should move. Recently, this list of basic requirements has expanded. We expect cellphones to…

How do we close the widening gap between Alberta and B.C.?

Part 1: The wine versus oil showdown in the West has exposed some fundamental differences – but it's nothing other generations haven't seen

How do we close the widening gap between Alberta and B.C.?There was only one other car at the Earls Cove ferry terminal last week as I headed home to Powell River. It was a brand new Jeep with a white-and-red Alberta licence plate grinning from the rear bumper. I say grinning because on my part of the Sunshine Coast, you rarely see an old beater…

Bizarre cult of oppression grips Canada’s West Coast

The environment is only a side issue for an increasingly passionate mob of activists whose assault on the ‘establishment’ is nothing less than a moral crusade

Bizarre cult of oppression grips Canada’s West CoastRegardless of your political feelings about Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, you have to admit the guy has guts. Not many politicians would have the courage to host a town-hall meeting in a place as openly hostile as Nanaimo, B.C. Immediately upon entering the building last week, the climate bullies jumped on him with a torrent…

PC carbon tax reversal still possible in Ontario

The Conservatives can reject their own carbon tax promise and defeat Kathleen Wynne in the June election

PC carbon tax reversal still possible in OntarioWhen the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party launched its policy platform, the People’s Guarantee, the most controversial proposal was implementing a carbon tax. Then-leader Patrick Brown was both praised and criticized for touting this decidedly anti-free-market concept. Brown, as we know, is no longer in charge. Two of the three declared leadership candidates, Christine Elliott and…

The green agenda comes at a high cost for Canadians

Government green programs impose costs on third parties. Consumers and taxpayers must pay for those policies, and the environment actually suffers

The green agenda comes at a high cost for CanadiansIn a 1999 interview, the late Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman remarked that there were good arguments for having government take action to reduce pollution, like smoke from power plants. That’s because the smoke imposes costs on third parties – for example, by dirtying property as well as surrounding public spaces. A power plant produces…
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